Noise Study Funded

  • E-Mail this Article
  • View Printable Article
  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

Well, there's not much argument that airports can be noisy, but city officials in Danbury, Conn., want to find out just how noisy theirs is. The FAA is apparently pretty interested, too, because it's chipping in $263,000 to help the city measure the noise and figure out land-use planning near the airport. Without the benefit of such a study -- not a recent one, anyway -- Danbury city fathers allowed construction of 64 homes on one busy flight path, but it's not clear if the potential conflicts created there prompted their latest ponderings. "Right now, we are flying blind," Mayor Mark Boughton told the Associated Press. "We don't have an empirical data about what's happening with noise at the airport. It's only anecdotal." But it's not like it's a new problem. While most aircraft manufacturers have taken strides to produce ever quieter aircraft, Boeing keeps a chart of the number of noise restrictions worldwide -- it has a notable increase beginning in the mid-1990s. Boeing even maintains a Web page devoted to keeping track of noise abatement procedures at 601 (maybe soon 602) airports worldwide. If you're curious about the restrictions at an airport near you (in the U.S.), they've got a site for that, too.