Public Security And Personal Freedom

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Of course, there are isolated incidents that don't help support the debate for relaxing security rules. A 20-year-old is accused of entering a 1966 Beechcraft Bonanza at Put-In-Bay Airport in Ohio on Sunday, starting the engine with keys found inside and taxiing into two parked cars. Law-enforcement officials told the Port Clinton News Herald the man was intoxicated at the time of his arrest. Such occurrences make New Jersey's two-lock rule and possibly other restrictions or laws appear quite sensible. But the rules will have an impact. "I think that we are going to lose some [airports]," Bruce Mundie, an inspector with the Maryland Aviation Administration, told The Baltimore Sun. At Clarksville airport near Washington, D.C., David Bassler feels frustrated with the effects the flight restrictions have imposed on Maryland's smaller airports. "Most people do it [fly] for the enjoyment, and it takes the enjoyment out of it if you can't just fly at will," he recently told the paper. Bassler isn't the only one complaining.