11 TFRs Change To National Security Areas

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Eleven TFRs will "disappear" over military installations over the next few months but that doesn't mean sightseers will be welcome in the future. According to AOPA, the TFRs are among 13 that were thrown up over important military bases immediately after 9/11. The Defense Department had wanted to make them permanent prohibited airspace but the FAA ruled against that in 11 of the 13 cases. The TFR designation will be removed on those 11 sites in favor of a National Security Area (NSA) designation that politely requests that civilian aircraft stay away voluntarily. The FAA does seem to think there's reason to permanently close the airspace (to civilians) over two military bases, however. Notices of Proposed Rulemaking to prohibit air traffic over bases in Bangor, Wash., and St Mary's, Ga., have been published and AOPA is opposing them. AOPA is particularly concerned about the impact of the proposed Bangor closure on floatplane traffic on the nearby Hood Canal. The other 11 TFRs will be turned into NSAs as new sectional charts are published. The first change occurs at Anniston, Ala., on Sept. 2.