New Year's Eve, Check NOTAMs Or Check Six

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Yes, the election season is over, but TFRs are here to stay. This week, it's New York's celebration of New Year's Eve that is closing down airspace. Aircraft are banned below 4,000 feet above parts of Manhattan from 8 p.m. on Friday until 1 a.m. on Saturday, affecting operations at several heliports and a seaplane base (stay far away from the big shiny ball -- and read the full NOTAM here). TFRs are also expected above Los Angeles for New Year's and during the upcoming football bowl games. EAA noted last week that a recent report by the federal Government Accountability Office acknowledged the negative economic impact of TFRs on the GA industry, yet found that the FAA does not have a system in place for their periodic review. Instead, keeping continuing TFRs in force is based on "unspecified security reasons submitted by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA)," the report said. EAA also said the departure of Secretary Tom Ridge and Deputy Secretary James Loy at the TSA will mean that 2005 starts off with a period of transition, and implies that it will be tough to make much progress on any issues until new leadership is in place.