ATL Class B: Legislation Without Representation?

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Atlanta's Class B airspace changed in October through direct final rule action, and EAA Wednesday publicized its discontent with the FAA's choice to exclude general aviation from that rulemaking process. According to EAA, exclusion of affected parties disregards the FAA's own guidelines for "input by those who will be affected by rule changes." The FAA contends that actions were taken to "enhance safety and to prevent significant air traffic delays in the National Airspace System," but EAA made clear its position that such reasoning in this case is not supported by "valid and legal reasoning" and it fears that such action could be used to set a precedent. In a four-page letter to the FAA, EAA questions the "enhanced safety" benefits noted by the FAA and states that the rule does not explain how the airspace changes would improve traffic delays. The FAA plans to conduct a review of the Atlanta Class B airspace in 2007. EAA is asking for assurance "that general aviation will be an active and vital component" in that, and all future airspace reviews.