What's Next For The Symphony 160?

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The current lead investor could resurrect the company and its airplane.

As for the future of the Symphony 160, "I don't know, specifically," Jeremy Keninger, the company's former national sales director, told AVweb. "I don't think it's the end of the aircraft -- it's a great value at that price point [IFR-equipped for about $165,000]," Keninger said. "It's too bad it didn't work out in Canada," where the company in recent years completed manufacturing facilities. Keninger could not confirm rumblings that the current lead creditor is thinking about resurrecting the company and bringing it to the U.S., where the cost of labor and efficient building practices would likely remain key issues. For aspiring owners with deposits already paid, "they will be treated as unsecured debts of [Symphony]," writes former president Paul Costanzo. "It is extremely unlikely that the proceeds of liquidation will be sufficient to pay the secured creditors, and as such the entirety of these deposit amounts will more than likely be lost." Demand for the design exists, but has been in short supply. Shipment reports published by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association show that Symphony has shipped 45 aircraft since 2002, but without an upward trend or even much consistency. The number is formed from 10 aircraft shipped in 2002, 19 in 2003, one aircraft in 2004, 10 in 2005 and five in 2006.