...Classified Charges Explained

  • E-Mail this Article
  • View Printable Article
  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

The new rules also ensure that those making an appeal will have at least some idea of the charges against them. Under the original rule, the TSA could refuse to provide the accused with details of the allegations if the information, or the way it was obtained, was considered classified. Again, it was entirely the TSA's call. The amended regulations require the TSA, in consultation with the CIA, to prepare an "unclassified summary" of classified evidence against an airman. The administrative law judge hearing the case gets to look at the classified evidence as part of his or her deliberations. The accused can also ask the judge to review the unclassified version of the evidence, presumably to ensure that it's a fair representation of the secret stuff.