...GA Caught In The Crosshairs...

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It's not just the trickle-down that will ping general aviation. GA is directly affected by the inclusion of Part 135 in the proposal. Any businesses that do work for on-demand charter services are also included in the drug/alcohol rule. "This is additional regulation at a time when the industry can least afford it," bemoans Filler. "Everyone I've talked to is disappointed. All the FAA has done is basically reissue their first rule." After the rule was initially proposed in 2002, ARSA led a coalition of 14 members who spent months working with the feds to come up with something that balances safety and common sense. But the May 17 FAA Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) pulls all businesses up and down the line into the drug/alcohol testing fold. The FAA calls the SNPRM a simple clarification to what it had already ruled. ARSA and the others call it a big letdown, especially since they were hoping for a change. During the next 90 days, Filler and company will be working to get the FAA to clarify the clarification in a way ARSA and others hope is more acceptable to the industry.