Sport Pilot Era, Year One

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Dozens Of Potential LSAs Ready To Fly...

When the brand-new and infinitely complex Sport Pilot rules debuted with lots of fanfare at Oshkosh late last month, the frequent reaction on the ground was, well, we'll wait and see. But EAA, having invested years of time and effort, isn't waiting -- they are up to their elbows in sorting through all the details, and re-disseminating the rule in digestible bites. On Friday, they published an updated list of "Likely Candidates for Light-Sport Aircraft," showing scores of fixed-wing birds, weight-shift trikes and powered parachutes that Sport Pilots can fly. However, just because an aircraft qualifies as a Light-Sport Aircraft (LSA) doesn't mean the manufacturer will choose to go through the necessary procedures to comply with the Light Sport regs. EAA said it will update the list as manufacturers announce their intentions, one way or the other. The list includes homebuilt, kit-built, and ready-to-fly aircraft that meet the LSA definition in the final FAA rules. A Sport Pilot may fly any aircraft that meets the LSA definition, no matter what its certification category. EAA said it will prepare a listing for gliders and gyroplanes at a later date.