...But They Saved The Airplane...

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However, the report also found that there was not a "clear, unambiguous indication or warning that a critical fuel leak existed," and the pilots had never experienced such a situation during operations or training. The investigators also said that Capt. Robert Piché's skill in conducting the subsequent engines-out dead-stick landing saved the lives of the 306 passengers and crew on board. The glide began at about 18,000 feet, lasted 19 minutes, and traversed 65 nm. Air Transat CEO Allen Graham said, "Since the occurrence we have reviewed our training programs and enhanced our processes, in terms of both maintenance and flight operations. ... This event is unique in our history." Piché became famous in Canada after the flight. He was awarded a Medal of Honour by the Quebec government, he wrote a best-selling book about his career, and a TV movie was made about him. Reports that he had once served prison time for drug-running seemed to only enhance his legend. He continues to work for Air Transat and frequently spoke about his experience to the public. When the accident report was released, he issued a statement saying it "confirms that the August 24, 2001, occurrence was the result of a chain of events, and identifies the risk factors involved. ... I feel that with the release of this report, the final chapter of this story has come to a close, and I will make no more comments at this time."