Accused No Stranger To Court

  • E-Mail this Article
  • View Printable Article
  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

The Supreme Court of Alaska recently uphelda $330,000 judgment against Casciola, which he'd appealed. The Supreme Court said the $30,000 award for real damages and the $300,000 award for punitive damages were justified to "vindicate Alaska's legitimate interest in preventing particularly malignant conduct." In the earlier judgment, an Alaska court upheld F.S. Air's allegation that Casciola had misrepresented the availability of two engines for one of its Learjet medevac aircraft and refused to refund the $25,000 deposit the company had given the broker. In that deal, Casciola had agreed to provide two "freshly overhauled" engines for just $100,000, plus the cores from the old engines. According to the Herald, Casciola has been named in at least 22 other civil actions between 1991 and 2004. Dave Bristow, a spokesman for the Manatee County Sheriff's office, said authorities moved on Casciola when they got wind of his next venture. "We were concerned because we heard that his next business is going to be in retirement and estate planning," Bristow said. Casciola was charged and released on $500,000 bail.