Why We Fly Ourselves -- Light Aerobatics In An RJ

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What Airline Passengers Endure

Some people will pay big bucks to fly aerobatics but we'd wager these folks just wanted to get to Pittsburgh. Nobody was reported injured after an American Airlines regional jet reportedly suffered severe roll- and yaw-control problems while en route from Dallas Tuesday evening. According to WTVQ News, the American Eagle Airlines Flight 3629, a Bombardier CJR-700, was cruising at 37,000 feet when the pilot "lost control." Passenger Gene Buttyan told the station that after the impromptu air show, the pilot made an announcement that he was "unable to control the plane" and that he'd "attempt" to make an emergency landing. The attempt was successful and the plane touched down at Blue Grass Airport in Lexington, Ky., about 9:30 p.m. John Hotard, a spokesman for AMR, told ABC news the aircraft suffered problems with a trim mechanism. For those with the stomach to keep going, we can only hope that United Air Lines did not become their default carrier after its computer did a back flip. Flights were delayed throughout the world after United's central computer crashed about 6 p.m. EST. The backup system kicked in, which allowed flights to operate, but passengers stood in long lines as airline staff manually checked baggage and wrote out boarding passes and other documents by hand. The system was back online before midnight but not before delaying more than 200 flights up to 90 minutes. No flights were cancelled, however.