Same AWOS Information No FAA "Certification"

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Stanwyck said his software is designed to interface with any of the more than 1,500 AWOS and ASOS installations across the country by plugging into already-existing data ports. But the FAA won't let him physically attach anything to the equipment, saying it is proprietary and he must have written permission from the companies that manufactured the gear before he can plug in with FAA approval. Since Stanwyck began the crusade, those companies have come up with Internet distribution systems of their own (which Stanwyck claims they copied from him), and Stanwyck said it's unlikely he'll get permission now. Stanwyck said the services offered by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are prohibitively expensive for many smaller airports while his is a fraction of their prices. About 600 of the weather stations are owned and maintained by the FAA and data is available from them over the Internet. The rest of the sites have been purchased and are maintained by local or state authorities, often with grants from the FAA. Stanwyck said that if he can convince the FAA to accept and certify his system, grants might be available to help airports install it.