Biz AV's AD Watch

  • E-Mail this Article
  • View Printable Article
  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

AVweb's coverage of Airworthiness Directives (ADs) includes the complete text of the documents, in Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF).

Bombardier

The FAA has issued a final rule for some Bombardier jets. This amendment adopts a new Airworthiness Directive (AD) that is applicable to certain Bombardier Model CL-600-2B19 (Regional Jet series 100 & 440) airplanes. This action requires revising the airworthiness limitations section of the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness by incorporating new structural inspection intervals for the pressure floor skin of the center fuselage at fuselage stations 460 and 513; repair if necessary; and submission of inspection findings to the airplane manufacturer. The FAA claims this action is necessary to detect and correct in a timely manner fatigue cracks of the pressure floor skin of the center fuselage at fuselage stations 460 and 513, which could result in failure of the pressure floor skin and consequent rapid decompression of the airplane during flight. The agency says this action is intended to address the identified unsafe condition. This final rule becomes effective May 14, 2003.

Cessna 441

The FAA has issued a final rule for some Cessna 441s. This amendment supersedes Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2002- 09-13, which currently requires a one-time inspection of the fuel boost pump wiring inside and outside the boost pump reservoir and repair or replacement of the wiring as necessary on certain Cessna Model 441 airplanes. AD 2002-09-13 resulted from several reports of chafing and/or arcing of the fuel boost pump wiring inside and outside the fuel pump reservoir. This AD retains the actions required in AD 2002-09-13, makes the one-time inspection repetitive, requires the inspection and possible replacement of the wire harness, lead wires and fuel boost pump on Model F406 airplanes, and requires eventual installation of an improved design wire harness and fuel boost pump as terminating action for the repetitive inspections. The FAA claims actions specified by this AD are intended to detect, correct, and prevent chafing and/or arcing fuel boost pump wiring, which could result in arcing within the wing fuel storage system. According to the agency, such a condition could lead to ignition of explosive vapor within the fuel storage system.

PC-12

The FAA has issued a final rule for some Pilatus aircraft. This amendment adopts a new Airworthiness Directive (AD) that applies to certain Pilatus Models PC-12 and PC-12/45 airplanes. This AD requires owners/operators to inspect the pedestal leg assembly on aft facing passenger seats for correct configuration. If incorrectly configured, this AD requires modification to the correct configuration. This AD is the result of mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by the airworthiness authority for Switzerland. The FAA says the action specified by this AD is intended to detect and correct pedestal leg assemblies on aft facing passenger seats that are in nonconformance with manufacturing standards. The agency claims nonconforming passenger seats could result in passenger injury in an emergency situation. This AD becomes effective on June 16, 2003.

Israel Aircraft Industries Ltd.

The FAA has issued Final Special Conditions for Israel Aircraft Industries Ltd. Model 1124 airplanes modified by Alternative Aviation Services. The agency claims these modified airplanes "will have a novel or unusual design feature when compared to the state of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport category airplanes." The modification incorporates the installation of dual Innovative Solutions & Support Air Data Display Units. In its notice, the FAA says "applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the protection of these systems from the effects of high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF). These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards." The effective date of these special conditions is April 18, 2003, but comments must be received on or before May 29, 2003.

Learjet 24/25

The FAA has issued Final Special Conditions for the Learjet Model 24/25 series airplanes, as modified by LJSC Ltd. The claims these airplanes "will have novel and unusual design features when compared to the state of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport category airplanes." The modification incorporates the installation of dual IS&S air data display units (ADDU) and a single IS&S analog interface unit (AIU). The agency says "applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the protection of these systems from the effects of high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF). These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that provided by the existing airworthiness standards." The effective date of these special conditions is April 14, 2003. Comments must be received on or before May 29, 2003.