Adam Flies Production A700

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Adam Aircraft this week took its first production version of its planned A700 twin-engine candidate in the coming very light jet (VLJ) sweepstakes for a spin. The airframe's first fight was conducted from the company's facility at Centennial Airport in Englewood, Colo., and was crewed by Bill Watters, vice president of flight operations, and Ken Sasine, senior turbine test pilot. The new A700, formally dubbed the "AdamJet," is serial number 002 and constitutes the first of three aircraft the company is building for tests leading to FAA certification. The jet's first flight lasted a planned 34 minutes. The new airframe joins the original A700 prototype, which has racked up some 400 flight hours since it first flew in July 2003. That aircraft, s/n 001, was used for aerodynamic and systems test data, creating a baseline for upcoming certification flight testing. According to Adam, s/n 001 will be used as a marketing and flight-test aircraft, visiting cities, airports, and aviation events across the United States. "The aircraft handled very well, stability was excellent, and the flight controls were very responsive and predictable," commented Sasine. "The throttle response was smooth and strong, and the climb performance was strong and steady. The airplane handled just as we expected."

"We're exceptionally pleased with the progress of the A700 jet program, and this first flight accelerates our A700 certification effort," said CEO Rick Adam. "The A700 Williams FJ-33 engines are already FAA-certified, and the 65% commonality from our FAA-Certified twin-engine piston will significantly reduce the A700 time-to-certification." The company said A700 s/n 002 is painted and striped in its full air taxi livery and features a production instrument panel with three-tube Avidyne Entegra avionics. The aircraft is constructed from production tooling, featuring a production fuselage with improved cabin window and emergency exit placement, with the balance of the aircraft manufactured from A500 production parts common to the A700. Adam says it has orders for more than 250 A700s.