AOPA Exits Electronic Flight Bag Market

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The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association has decided to exit the electronic flight bag (EFB) marketómarking a change in its online flight planning member benefit. Responsibility for FlyQ EFB will be assumed by Seattle Avionics as of Sept. 1. AOPA and Seattle Avionics are reported to be working together to ensure all subscribers experience a smooth transition. Starting in 2015, AOPA will return to the AOPA Internet Flight Planner (AIFP) powered by Jeppesen. AIFP will remain a free member benefit. AOPA said that since its initial launch in 2007, AIFP became a popular feature on the organization's website. AOPA is working with Jeppesen on migrating user data from FlyQ Web. In the transition back to AIFP, AOPA will be returning to the same version as existed when the switch was made to FlyQ Web. A "beta" version of AIFP will be available for members to start using this fall. A full transition will occur after AOPA determines that it is comfortable with the user experience and has ensured that the full transition will be as smooth and seamless as possible. AOPA will keep all members and flight planner users informed as the process goes forward.

An EFB is an electronic information management device that helps pilots perform flight management tasks more easily and efficiently with less paper. It is a general purpose computing platform intended to reduce, or replace, paper-based reference material often found in the pilot's carry-on flight bag, including the aircraft operating manual and navigational charts. AOPA is the second organization to leave the EFB/tablet app marketóBendix King having done so earlier.