AOPA On Flying Post-9/11

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"General aviation is more secure" following 9/11, according to AOPA president Phil Boyer, "in large part, because the pilot community has a vested interest in protecting their aircraft and airports." Perhaps just as important, it's possible that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has noticed, too. DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff recently said, "the fact is that government, the federal government or the state government, does not need to order people to protect assets when the people themselves place great value on the assets." In those areas where the government has stepped in, AOPA points out that it worked with the TSA -- specifically on developing a process for student pilot background checks that would not adversely affect new pilot starts.

Reminding pilots of AOPA's efforts to fend off unnecessary temporary flight restrictions and work to assure the threats posed by general aviation aircraft were properly understood (AOPA commissioned a report on the risk general aviation aircraft pose to nuclear power plants), Boyer reminds pilots to remain vigilant. "We always need to be looking out for our aircraft and airports."