EAA Celebrates End Of Homebuilt Law

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People in Jacksonville, Fla., are free to cover a rudder, rig an aileron or dope a wing in the comfort of their own home thanks to the local council's decision to quash an ordinance that banned anyone from working on aircraft in residential areas. The so-called "Everett Law" was unanimously struck from the books on Sept. 27. It was named after the person who took exception to that kind of activity in his neighborhood and found like-minded members of council to push through an ordinance against it. Although it was purely a local issue, EAA, fearing a precedent that might spread, poured its considerable resources into the fight in support of the local chapter. EAA government affairs expert Earl Lawrence was in Jacksonville on Thursday to help local members celebrate. The chapter president presented Councilwoman Glorious Johnson, who spearheaded the elimination of the law, with a framed "Kill The Everett Law" t-shirt like those worn by EAA members in protests and at council meetings. Lawrence commended the well-organized and effective local effort. "It's important to recognize the work of EAA chapters, who led the effort to ensure that people who dream of creating their own aircraft have the opportunity to do so in Jacksonville," Lawrence said. "EAA is what it is because of what our members do. Our job is to facilitate our members' privilege to use their hands and hearts to create great things for aviation and our society."