No Serious Injuries In Global 5000 Crash Landing

  • E-Mail this Article
  • View Printable Article
  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

Heavy, wet snow and strong winds were present when a Bombardier Global 5000 business jet's landing gear collapsed after the aircraft apparently landed short of the runway at a private airport at a golf resort in Nova Scotia on Sunday. None of the eight passengers and two crew was seriously hurt, although some were checked in to the hospital. Aircraft owner Ron Joyce, who is also the owner of the golf course and a pilot, told the Canadian Press the crash was like a car accident, only more spectacular. "We don't know, I don't know what happened," Joyce said. "... I am just happy to be standing here talking to you. It scared the hell out of me." Joyce, who co-founded a popular chain of Canadian donut shops called Tim Horton's, said he doesn't know if the $35 million jet, which has less than 100 hours on it, will be repairable. The Canadian Press said it appears the aircraft touched down just short of the runway at Fox Harb'r Resort and hit a small lip, collapsing the gear. Canada's Transportation Safety Board is on the scene and has begun its investigation. "We're going to look at all aspects, the weather conditions, and we'll look at the operation, the training of the pilots, everything," said spokesman Yves Joliceur. Joyce was thankful no one was hurt but lamented the possible loss of the airplane. "Whether they can repair it or not, I don't know, but it will be a long time before it's flying again if it can be," said Joyce, who is 77."This is an absolutely marvelous airplane. I'm heartbroken because I was looking forward to doing a lot of traveling with it, and it's good for the business we're involved in."