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New This Week

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Our weekly visit through the news we receive found announcements of some new products ready for release at Sun ‘n Fun as well as word that life limits on Oregon Aero High-G Safety Seats have been lifted and that drawings will be held by Superior Air Parts for free tuition to its XP-Engine Build School. Garmin announced its new G3X Touch, a large touchscreen, glass flight display system for installation in experimental amateur-built and light sport aircraft (LSA). The non-certified G3X Touch system offers pilots what was described as easy-to-read, easy-to-use, high-resolution 10.6-inch flight displays with split-screen functionality and a number of advanced interface options. As a result of what it referred to as extensive funding, research and development on its part, Oregon Aero Inc. has obtained FAA approval so owners of Cessna (formerly known as Lancair or Columbia) aircraft are no longer faced with a mandatory five-year or 2500-hour replacement of Oregon Aero High-G Safety Seats. Owners can now conduct annual inspections and one more detailed inspection every three years to assess the condition of the cushions.

Superior Air Parts announced that visitors to its booth (LD-002) during Sun 'n Fun will be able to enter into a daily drawing to win free tuition to Superior's popular XP-Engine Build School—or a certificate good for a $1,000 rebate off the price of four Superior Millennium Cylinders. Scott Hayes, V.P. of sales and marketing for Superior said, "Everyone that attends the XP-Engine Build School comes away with a lot more knowledge and confidence in how an engine is built, and more importantly, a greater appreciation of the impact proper operation has on the life of the engine." Finally, Recreational Mobility announced a new product called FlareAssist(TM), enabling pilots of Experimental Amphibious and Float equipped aircraft to properly judge the height of the aircraft over glassy water. FlareAssist consists of an external mounted transducer that uses rapid pulses of ultra-high frequency sound waves, then annunciates the computer-filtered results through the pilot's headset.

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