New This Week

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AVweb's weekly review of what's happening in aviation found everything from a flight program for young cancer survivors through new Hartzell props for the world's fastest turboprop to the newest recipient of the EAA's August Raspet Award and an NTSB training program in emergency communications. Summit Aviation and Eagle Mount announced a partnership to bring the thrill of flying to young cancer survivors. The five-day Pilot Program, Aug. 25 - 29, will give flight training to a group of young adults in the Gallatin Valley, near Bozeman, Montana. Eagle Mount has been providing adventure programs to young people with cancer since 1982 and Summit Aviation has been providing flight training since 2001. Hartzell Propeller Inc. will supply new advanced lightweight propellers to Piaggio Aero Industries for its third-generation twin-engine Avanti EVO, the world's fastest production turboprop. For the EVO, Hartzell worked with Piaggio to develop new highly swept wide-chord aluminum alloy propellers that in conjunction with changes to the nacelle and engine-exhaust geometry combine to reduce external noise by 68 percent or five dB(A). Passenger comfort is also improved by a cabin noise reduction of 20 percent, or one dB(A), attributable in large measure to Hartzell's five-blade scimitar design.

Troy Woodland, a partner in the Just Aircraft Company, was selected by the EAA for the prestigious August Raspet Award in 2014. The award is given each year to an individual who has made a significant contribution to the field of light aircraft design. Woodland began designing in the 1990s, but it was his SuperSTOL that set him apart as he explored new technology in the design. Included in his latest effort are self-adjusting slats on the leading edge of the wings, Fowler flaps, hydraulic strut landing gear with more than 20 inches of stroke and a locking, shock-absorbing tail wheel. Finally, the National Transportation Safety Board is devoting two days at its Training Center, Oct. 23 and 24, to offer guidance to aviation public affairs professionals on how to most effectively manage emergency communications following a major aircraft accident or incident. The training is aimed at communications professionals working with airports, airlines, air charter operators and corporations with aviation departments. NTSB specialists will explain the process by which investigation-related information is verified and released. Members of the national news media will be there to discuss how they cover aviation accidents and how social media is changing how breaking news is disseminated and consumed. Aviation communications professionals will provide case studies highlighting best practices and lessons learned during previous aircraft incidents and accidents.