Schrenker Planning Book

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If you've been wondering what was going on in Marcus Schrenker's head when he bailed out of his turboprop Malibu over Georgia last January, you may be able to read all about it. The former Indiana money manager told the Pensacola News Journal in a jailhouse letter that he's thinking about writing a book about his life and that defining moment Jan. 11 when he told air traffic control his windshield had shattered and he was declaring an emergency. He was arrested two days later in a Chattahoochee campground after parachuting to safety in Georgia and riding away on a motorcycle he'd put in a rented storage unit the day before. Schrenker, who appears in court April 24, says the media got his story mostly wrong at the time.

But in the letter to the newspaper, Schrenker also says he wishes he'd died in the airplane "with honor" and spared his family the public aftermath. "The irony is that if I'd have died, my family would have lived a life with no embarrassment and certainly not be involved in a high profile international story as we're involved in," he wrote. There were no injuries in the crash, which occurred near houses in Milton, Fla. The aircraft was tailed by an F-16 as it flew on autopilot and the military pilot reported the windshield appeared to be intact. In the letter, Schrenker insists there was an "explosion" that prompted his bailout but he doesn't address his handy access to the motorcycle. After the Florida courts have dealt with the crash-related issues, Schrenker will be sent back to Indiana to answer for millions he's alleged to have bilked from investors. "The Indiana issue is very complex and in no way was myself or my wife ever compensated by a diversion of investor funds," he said. "Our losses that we experienced were because of investment devaluations."