Spitfire Search Resumes In Burma

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David Cundall, an aviation enthusiast from the U.K., is back in Burma searching for buried Spitfire airplanes, with a new sponsor, according to recent news reports. Cundall returned to Burma last month to search for pristine Spitfires he believes were buried there at the end of World War II. His previous sponsor, the Belarussian video gaming company Wargaming.net, withdrew support for the project last February after evidence of Cundall's theories failed to materialize. The Claridon Group, a British freight-handling business with an office in Burma, now is backing the project. Chris Scott, managing director of Claridon, said that after meeting Cundall, "and seeing his deep-rooted passion for preserving part of our history and heritage for generations to come, we just had to get involved."

At the Claridon website, Scott said, "We will be supporting David every step of the way and look forward to bringing the Spitfires back home for him." Cundall said he hopes to find the lost Spitfires this time and ship them back to the U.K., where "they will find homes in museums up and down the country." Claridon didn't say how much funding it would supply to the effort, or for how long. Cundall told his local U.K. newspaper, The Birmingham Mail, that he has found new evidence to bolster his search since he was last in Burma. I have an expert who has confirmed evidence that shows there are large metallic objects at depth in the same place as eyewitnesses saw Spitfire boxes being buried," he said. "I have a bore hole machine that will cut through concrete and steel and we will then place a camera down a hole and capture the images." He believes up to 36 airplanes might be awaiting discovery.