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This happened just three days ago, during instrument training, while copying and reading back a clearance for only the second time ever. Clearance Delivery (after I'd read back my clearance correctly) : "Readback correct. What runway, and how long?" Me: "Runway 03, and it's 4,200 feet long." I can only imagine what the controller said at that time. My instructor keyed in immediately to clear things up. Brian Smith via e-mail More

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Back in the 1970s, while flying an MU-2 into El Paso, Texas, I heard the following exchange between approach and an airline crew after repeated attempts to get the crew to reduce speed: Approach: "Flight 123, I must have you at 120 knots right now." Captain of Flight 123: "Son, do you have any idea of the stalling speed of this thing?" Approach: "No sir, but I bet if you ask your co-pilot he can tell you." Larry Bartlett via e-mail More

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When an air traffic controller asked an aircraft to reduce speed even more than he already had: Aircraft 1234: "If I reduce any further, I'll fall out of the sky!" Controller: "Roger. Report leaving altitudes on descent." Ed LeSage via e-mail More

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One day I took a friend's son up for a flight in my Cessna 150. As we flew around the area, I explained, "One of the things we have to do is look out for other airplanes." As I was scanning the skies, I found a plane off in the distance and pointed it out to the young boy. "Do you see the plane over there?" I asked. "Yes," he replied. "Is it one of ours?" Ron Hogle via e-mail More

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In view of all the recent hurricane news coverage, I recalled a pertinent exchange from the the Port Columbus, Ohio (CMH) tower. I worked at the "Lane Gate" vehicle check point for several years, regularly monitoring the tower frequency to get a "play by play" description of what was going on around me. I overheard the following exchange the day after the remnants of hurricane Ike came through, causing a lot of downed trees and subsequent power outages. A recently landed ERJ was taxiing to the ramp and called the tower: ERJ: "CMH Tower, American Eagle 1234. I hear you guys got a lot of wind yesterday. How much did you get?" Tower: "American Eagle 1234, Tower. The highest gust I saw was 68mph, and then the wind thingee blew away." (78mph gusts were reported by the news media.) Edwin Esson via e-mail More

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Royal Flying Doctor Service was flying a B200 IFR out of Broken Hill, Australia and had a young student doctor in the right seat, who was unfamiliar with flying and for whom English was a second language. As the flight progressed, the pilot noticed the student becoming more and more uncomfortable and, after a normal landing, noted an undue amount of relief on the student's face. Pilot: "Why are you so relieved?" Student Doctor: "Because we survived the emergency." Pilot: "Err, what emergency?" Student Doctor: "You know. I heard you on the radio talking about 'my big dilemma.'" (She had misheard the call sign "Mike Victor Lima" ... . Duane Stace via e-mail More

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Heard on KBIS tower frequency years ago: Tower: "NorthWest XYZ, cleared to land, 31. Be advised of model rocketry testing from the United Tribes Educational Center just west of the airport." Northwest XYZ (with a Texas drawl) : "Ah liked it bettah when they only used bows and arrows." Rob Scarlett via e-mail More

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Overheard on the radio a few years ago: N1234: "Kalamazoo approach, student pilot N1234 five miles west." Approach: "Are you the red and blue Cessna 172?" N1234: "Yes. How did you knnow?" Approach: "I have color radar. N1234, go to tower 123.45." Me: "Kalamazoo approach, white Bonanza with black and red stripes checking in." Approach (laughing) : "I used to fly that 172!" Robert Brown via e-mail More

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Departing north from Moorabbin (YMMB) on a warm summer's day, in a very tired rental Arrow, I was cleared to climb in class C over the busy approach to Melbourne. Centre: "ABC, cleared to Eildon Weir; climb 7,500." [shortly thereafter ...] Centre: "ABC, maintain best rate of climb." Me: "Best rate? I'm pedaling as fast as I can." Andrew Fry via e-mail More

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Several years ago, as the volume of traffic was increasing at BNA, an American Eagle flight received and acknowledged an incorrect altimeter setting. After mentioning it to ground control, he added: "Well, up-periscope and taxi to the ramp!" Rich Mays via e-mail More