Short Final

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through as this week's winner wraps things up at OSH. More

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in as this week's winner keeps it quiet to accomodate local regs. More

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in as this week's winner makes his way across the taxiway. More

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in on this week's winner. More

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in on this week's winner. More

Short Final »

Last week at our local airport (CYKF), the automated AWOS/ATIS was out of commission. So one of our well-known ATC guys (Dave Clark, who was working ground control at the time) was heard on the ATIS frequency stating: "The automated AWOS/ATIS is currently unavailable. Winds are light and variable, and vis is CAVOK; runway 14 is in use, altimeter 29:95." The pilot ahead of me taxiing out called ground and said: "Waterloo Ground, this is Cessna CXYZ with information DAVE!" The ground controller (Dave Clark) immediately broke up, and we all had a good chuckle. T. G. Bennett via e-mail More

Short Final »

The company that I was with had a chief pilot who liked to play with ATC (in the '60s): Bonanza 123: "Bonanza 123. Give me the word. I want to make like a bird." Detroit Tower: "You got the nod. Leave the sod!" Bud Walker via e-mail More

Short Final »

Back in the '70s, a Southern gentleman friend was an airline pilot who owned a C-182 that he called "Juan" as in "Juan Eighty-Two." His N-number ended in 4Q , and if he either wanted a laugh or didn't like an ATC instruction, he acknowledged with, "Roger. Four Q." Pronounced in that Southern-gentlemanly style that sounded more like, "Roger. Fork you." Bless his heart, he always gave me a $20 bill any time he came in the shop. And now you know why we now need a full N-number readback! Tom Ciura via e-mail More

Short Final »

In the early '70s in Orlando, an Aztec, N910JQ, would always ask for a straight in to Herndon. So we could say: "Nine ten Jack Queen has a possible straight." Jim Woolf via e-mail More

Short Final »

While flying a Beech 18 in the late 1960s, my instructor requested take-off clearance in an unusual way: XXX Tower: "Twin Beech N1234 ready to accelerate on runway heading to generate sufficient lift to overcome the effects of gravity." Without skipping a beat, the tower retorted: "Twin Beech N1234, you are cleared to accelerate on runway heading to generate sufficient lift to overcome the effects of gravity." Patrick Tallon via e-mail More