Short Final

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in on this week's winner. More

Short Final »

Each week in "Short Final," we select the strangest, funniest, or most unusual thing AVweb readers have heard over the radio -- either from other pilots or coming directly from the Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower. Click through to listen in on this week's winner. More

Short Final »

Last week at our local airport (CYKF), the automated AWOS/ATIS was out of commission. So one of our well-known ATC guys (Dave Clark, who was working ground control at the time) was heard on the ATIS frequency stating: "The automated AWOS/ATIS is currently unavailable. Winds are light and variable, and vis is CAVOK; runway 14 is in use, altimeter 29:95." The pilot ahead of me taxiing out called ground and said: "Waterloo Ground, this is Cessna CXYZ with information DAVE!" The ground controller (Dave Clark) immediately broke up, and we all had a good chuckle. T. G. Bennett via e-mail More

Short Final »

The company that I was with had a chief pilot who liked to play with ATC (in the '60s): Bonanza 123: "Bonanza 123. Give me the word. I want to make like a bird." Detroit Tower: "You got the nod. Leave the sod!" Bud Walker via e-mail More

Short Final »

Back in the '70s, a Southern gentleman friend was an airline pilot who owned a C-182 that he called "Juan" as in "Juan Eighty-Two." His N-number ended in 4Q , and if he either wanted a laugh or didn't like an ATC instruction, he acknowledged with, "Roger. Four Q." Pronounced in that Southern-gentlemanly style that sounded more like, "Roger. Fork you." Bless his heart, he always gave me a $20 bill any time he came in the shop. And now you know why we now need a full N-number readback! Tom Ciura via e-mail More

Short Final »

In the early '70s in Orlando, an Aztec, N910JQ, would always ask for a straight in to Herndon. So we could say: "Nine ten Jack Queen has a possible straight." Jim Woolf via e-mail More

Short Final »

While flying a Beech 18 in the late 1960s, my instructor requested take-off clearance in an unusual way: XXX Tower: "Twin Beech N1234 ready to accelerate on runway heading to generate sufficient lift to overcome the effects of gravity." Without skipping a beat, the tower retorted: "Twin Beech N1234, you are cleared to accelerate on runway heading to generate sufficient lift to overcome the effects of gravity." Patrick Tallon via e-mail More

Short Final »

I heard the following a few days ago over eastern Kentucky: Flagship 123: "Indy Center, Flagship 123 climbing through 12,000." Indy Center: "Flagship 123, roger. What was your assigned heading?" Flagship 123: "370." Indy Center: "370?!" Flagship 123: "370." Indy Center: "O.K. Continue present heading." Dennis Mahan via e-mail More

Short Final »

This gave me a little chuckle because it rhymed so well. The pilot knew too, as he said it with pauses: Line up and wait... Runway 28... Cirrus 188 Shawn Byers via e-mail More

Short Final »

I was flying just northeast of Dallas on Monday, April 22. This was the first day of sequester-induced cutbacks of controllers. Fort Worth Center: "King Air 12345, cleared direct FINGR for the FINGR3 arrival." King Air 12345: "Cleared direct FINGR." Fort Worth Center: "They told us not to give any shortcuts today, but I don't see any way to do it except to give you the finger." I was laughing too hard to hear the King Air's reply. Steve Beckerdite via e-mail More