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Between Houston and Austin on December 18, 2012, I overheard the following breif conversation between Houston Center and another aircraft: Aircraft: "Houston Center, can you give me a current altimeter setting?" Center: "At your altitude, it is 29.92." Aircraft: "Uhhhh -- yeah." [A brief pause.] Aircraft: "Guess I will see that one in the back of IFR magazine next month." Larry Frasier via e-mail More

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A double-dose of holiday merriment to celebrate the season. As a retired NWA/Rep/NCA pilot, I spent a lot of time in and out of ORD. One time, leaving the gate for departure, we heard ground control say to us: "Via the outer and over the bridge, to 32 rt you go." Very melodic for the season. John Clark via e-mail In the early 1970s, just before Christmas: Landing at Burbank, California, the ATIS was: "Information Raindeer" When we departed a short time later, it was: "Information Santa Clause" On Christmas Day a few days later, Van Nuys ATIS: "Advise Van Nuys Ground or Tower on initial contact that you are having a merry Christmas." Terry Lankford via e-mail More

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This happened about 40 years ago. We had just had a snow storm at the airport I worked at, which was serviced by a commuter airline flying Twin Otters. It was near Christmas, and as the plane took the runway, the pilot announced over the unicom: "Air North flight XXX is dashing through the snow, runway 23." Denis Arquette via e-mail More

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Heard at Orlando Executive: Tower: "Ercoupe 1234, we have a blimp landing to the right of runway 7. Reduce speed." Ercoupe: "1234 reducing speed." Tower: "1234, make a half-'S' turn to the left." Ercoupe: "1234 making a half-assed turn to the left." Robert C. Abbaticchio via e-mail More

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Several years ago, while passing through Caracas air space, I heard this on the radio: Piper 1234: "Caracas Control, Piper 1234 inbound for full stop." Caracas: "Piper 1234, turn right five degrees to intercept the ILS." Piper 1234: "Caracas, five degrees is too little a turn for me." Caracas: "Piper 1234, can you make a 90-degree turn?" Piper 1234: "Affirmative. I can do 90 degrees." Caracas: "Roger. Piper 1234, make a 95-degree turn to the right, then make a 90-degree turn to the left to intercept the ILS." Tom McEntire via e-mail More

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As an AIM AIR missionary pilot flying in South Sudan, listening in on Juba International Airport's frequency can provide a few minutes of eye-watering laughs. It is a completely non-radar environment, and all position reports are by radial and DME. Everyone, from the British Airways flights transiting overhead to our small bush airplanes, all share the common frequency. Last year, I heard this exchange between a Kenya Airways jet and the tower controller after he was done handling half a dozen other aircraft: Juba: "Kenya 543, please state your position." Kenya 543: "Juba, we are on the ground." Juba (rapidly) : "Confirm on the ground!" Kenya 543: "Yes, sir. On the ground." Juba (pausing) : "Roger. Vacate via taxiway Bravo. Over to the marshaler." Needless to say, my confidence in their traffic separation abilities went way up! Jerry Hurd via e-mail More

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A friend of mine is a helicopter instructor in Arizona, and a student of his is approaching the cross-country flight portion of flight training. My instructor friend received this text from his student a few days ago: Hey, you've got me down for a cross-country to TBD. Where is it? I can't find it anywhere! Kate via e-mail More

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Climbing out of Houston on a Sunday afternoon: Houston Center: "Citation 123, please see if you can contact Challenger ABCD on 128.17 and have them contact Houston Center." [A few minutes pass.] Challenger ABCD: "Houston Center, this is Challenger ABCD checking in at flight level 360." Houston Center: "Roger, Challenger ABCD. Descend to FL 240. What was the last frequency you were on?" Challenger ABCD: "It was New York Center 132.05. They never handed us off." Peter Serodino via e-mail More

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In the late 1950s, our aero club was transitioning from Tiger Moths without radio to "cabin class" with the addition of a Tri-Pacer and a C-172A, where the flights were made without headsets using the overhead speaker. It came that an MK-5 Auster we had been restoring was due for test flying, and our chief flying instructor decided he must make the flight. The Auster duly taxied to the far edge of our all-over field, where it sat for five minutes before returning to the tarmac. The CFI climbed out and stated that he could hardly hear the speaker, and please do not waste his time until it was fixed. Nothing was really said; we just pointed to the earphones hanging behind his head. Jim Hammond via e-mail More

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Overheard during a very, very rough ride out of Newark last week: Center: "Airliner 123, how is your ride?" Airliner 123: "The rides are crap." [momentary pause] Airliner 123: "I'm sorry. That was unprofessional of me. The rides are unsatisfactory." Center: "Your first description was acceptable." Rob Nabieszko via e-mail More