AVwebFlash - Volume 18, Number 7b

February 16, 2012

By The AVweb Editorial Staff
 
AV-HD Aircraft Camera System || Available from 
Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co. - With a Case of Camguard Oil Additive
Aircraft Spruce Offers the AV-HD Aircraft Camera System
The AV-HD is a high-definition aircraft camera system which records video in full 1080P HD, featuring a built-in LCD screen. AV-HD is compact and loaded with features. The AV-HD was designed to be high-quality, rugged, and yet easy to use. Everything you need is included for a quick and easy way to capture your flight in full HD. From February 1-29, use promo code CAMGUARD12 and get a case (four pints) of Camguard at no charge. Call 1 (877) 4‑SPRUCE or visit AircraftSpruce.com.
 
AVflash! FAA Makes Way for Drones back to top 
 

Coming Soon: Era Of UAS?

The new FAA reauthorization bill that was signed into law this week by President Obama (PDF) creates a fast track for the integration of civil unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace. The legislation states that the FAA and the UAS industry must work together to develop a "comprehensive plan" by mid-November that will safely achieve the full integration of UAS by Sept. 30, 2015. Deadlines for certain smaller systems are set even sooner. For example, first responders will be allowed to fly small UAS weighing 4.4 pounds or less within 90 days. And within six months, the FAA must designate six test ranges where the UAS can fly to develop their sense-and-avoid capabilities.

Within one year, small UAS under 55 pounds will be allowed to fly in the Arctic regions of the U.S., 24 hours a day, at an altitude of at least 2,000 feet. By mid-2014, small UAS that weigh under 55 pounds will be allowed to fly in the national airspace system. "Technology is advancing to the point where we now know these systems can reliably fly," said Michael Toscano, president of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. "The next step is to work on the regulations that govern the rules of the sky to ensure that unmanned aircraft do no harm to other manned aircraft or to people or property on the ground." The legislation says that all UAS must have a "sense and avoid capability," and standards will be set for the licensing of operators. The FAA also will be required to study the causes of accidents involving UAS.

 
Hartzell Aircraft Starters || Aviation-Manufactured, OEM-Endorsed, Factory-Installed - For 
Over 20 Years
Lycoming & Continental Aircraft Starters: Aviation-Manufactured, OEM-Endorsed, & Factory-Installed — For Over 20 Years
TCM supplier Hartzell Engine Technologies introduces the zero back torque M-Drive starter — the best lightweight starter designed to start even the hardest-cranking large-bore TCM engines while safely disengaging from the starter adapter. Lycoming-chosen E-Drive starters from Hartzell Engine Technologies are unaffected by kick-backs, saving hours of service time and replacement costs along with the best warranty available — two-year unlimited!

More on Hartzell Engine Technologies' aircraft starters ...
 
Lean Times Ahead for Air Travel? back to top 
 

Obama Budget Would Cut Airline, Airport Funding

The new Obama administration budget proposal, released on Monday, had general aviation advocates worried about user fees, but other aviation sectors have also found cause for concern. The Air Line Pilots Association was unhappy about proposed cuts of $36 million from the Federal Air Marshal Service and $13 million from the federal flight deck officer program, which trains volunteer pilots to carry firearms on board. Lee Moak, president of ALPA, said funding for the FFDO program is already "minimal," and any further reduction "could very well lead to its ultimate demise." Airlines would face increased security fees, as well as a $100 departure fee to help cover the cost of the air traffic control system. Funding for improvements at medium and large airports would be cut by 27 percent.

Airline travelers, under the proposal, would pay up to $25.5 billion in fees over the next 10 years, with the goal of covering the costs of aviation security through user fees "and not by the general taxpayers," according to the budget plan. However, $18 billion of those fees would go to pay down general government debt, not to provide security, according to The Wall Street Journal. It's widely expected that most of these proposals will be rejected by Congress, and the budget plan will never be enacted in its current form.

 
Buy Today and Ship Tomorrow - Over 50 Engines in 
Process || Continental Motors
Stock Engines Expanded on Continental
Factory-Rebuilt and New Engines

Many models are available for immediate shipment. Others will ship within 1-2 weeks. Over 50 engines in process. Visit CMI's stock engine list daily for updates at ContinentalMotors.aero/stockengines.aspx.
 
Rotor Rodeo Wraps back to top 
 

Heli-Expo Draws Crowds And Buyers To Dallas

Heli-Expo, the annual event for vertical aviators, closed out on Tuesday with record attendance, reporting more than 19,000 visitors to the four-day show in Dallas. More than 650 exhibitors filled the show floor, and 60 helicopters were on display. Eurocopter announced sales of 191 aircraft at the show, valued at $1.44 billion. "For the whole of last year we sold 170 helicopters," Eurocopter CEO Lutz Bertling told Agence France Presse. "This year, we sold 191 in just three days." Of those sales, the newly upgraded EC130 T2, designed for tourism and transport, counted for 105. Russian Helicopters showed its new medium-lift aircraft, the Mi-171A2, a heavily upgraded version of the popular Soviet-era Mi-8. The new design features modern avionics, new engines, composite rotor blades, and seats for up to 26 passengers. Deliveries are scheduled to start in 2014.

Over the weekend, the show opened with the introduction of a new "super-medium" design from Bell and an update from Robinson. Click here for video of the Bell 525 unveiling. The mood in the exhibit hall was "extremely upbeat" among both exhibitors and attendees, according to Helicopter Association International, which organizes the show. Manufacturers reported "very strong" sales, HAI said. "For four years in a row, now, Heli-Expo has grown in size and number of exhibitors," said HAI President Matt Zuccaro. "We're looking forward to next year's show in Las Vegas." Next year's show is set for March 4 to 7, 2013.

 
CessnaParts.com || The Easiest Way to Find and Buy Cessna Parts
Your #1 Parts Source for Cessna Single & Twin Engine Aircraft, Including 208 Caravans
Virtually every Cessna part you need — with fast delivery and competitive pricing. Don't waste time searching — CessnaParts.com already has what you're looking for — including exceptional customer service and support. We also offer many aftermarket product lines, including Aeroflash, Airborne, Alcor, Brackett Filters, Champion, Continental, GE bulbs, Gill batteries, Lycoming, and Slick magnetos, among others. Need hard-to-find or discontinued items? Ask us! Call 1 (800) 998‑7832. Or click here.
 
History Comes Alive — At 9:10 Scale back to top 
 

British Spitfire Builders Attract Support

A group of aviation enthusiasts in the U.K. is steadily moving ahead with an ambitious plan to build a fleet of 90-percent-scale Spitfires, and the interest sparked by the project may have helped to save their local airport. Paul Fowler, owner of The Enstone Flying Club, attracted a lot of publicity with his plan to build a squadron of Spitfire replicas. The project drew visitors to the airport, and the local support to keep the field active seems to have been a factor in thwarting a proposal to build a solar powerplant on the field that would have interfered with flying. "It would be a tragedy if we lost this airfield, as it's one of the few places left like this in the country, and the chances of finding a place like this again are zero," Fowler told the Banbury Guardian.

The club has two Spitfire replicas in the works and is now offering shares to supporters who might want to be part of the project but don't want to be on the builder team. The first kit is more than half done and is expected to fly in April or May. The club also offers tailwheel training in a J3 Cub. "You could not find a more appropriate training aircraft for the Spitfire," says the club newsletter. "The J3 Cub has it all, a bit of a handful in crosswinds, challenging on hard surfaces, not a great view from the rear seat when solo ... . 25 hours tailwheel experience is all that is required."

 
AircraftTax.com || Scott Horton, Attorney & CPA || Have Your Return Prepared or Reviewed an 
Aircraft Tax Attorney & CPA
Have Your Tax Return Prepared or Reviewed
by an Aircraft Tax Attorney & CPA

Plan ahead to maximize your tax benefits. And get advice on how to best structure your aircraft ownership to minimize sales and use tax, maximize federal tax benefits, and ensure compliance with FARs.
No-charge consultation for pilots considering an aircraft purchase!

For more, click here.
 
What You Missed in AVwebBiz This Week back to top 
 

FCC To Suspend LightSquared Plans

The FCC will indefinitely suspend LightSquared's authority to carry terrestrial broadband signals on frequencies close to GPS frequencies after receiving a report that concludes the two systems cannot currently coexist. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) wrote (PDF) the FCC on Tuesday saying there was no immediate solution to interference problems found in testing GPS units in the presence of the types of signals that LightSquared is proposing. The FCC conditionally allowed LightSquared to use frequency bands it owned adjacent to the GPS bands provided it could prove the broadband wouldn't step on GPS. A year of testing demonstrated serious and widespread interference according to NTIA. LightSquared says it "profoundly disagrees" with those findings and was fighting to have the FCC rule in its favor right up until the decision was announced. The battle isn't officially over yet.

According to PC World, the FCC was planning to issue a public notice of its intentions on Wednesday and will seek public comment on its plan and the NTIA's conclusions. The NTIA did leave a crack in the door by saying it would like to work with the FCC and industry to tackle the interference problems so that spectrum can be freed up to be used for broadband. LightSquared hasn't said what it intends to do with the decision which will effectively cancel its plans for a $14 billion high speed wireless system.

OEMs Laud Asia's Aerospace Future

Cessna says China will be in the top ten of business jet markets by 2025 and other Asian countries will combine to take a significant share of production. In a presentation at the Singapore Air Show, Trevor Esling, Cessna's VP of sales for the region said the performance of of the Asian market through the global recession has positioned it for major growth in medium to long term. "The region's economic resilience during the global financial crisis, rising national prosperity and Chinese liberalization make it likely that the business aviation market will mature at quite a rapid pace," Esling said. "Cessna, therefore, expects demand for light and mid-size aircraft to rise accordingly." If the bizjet OEMs are optimistic, the airline side is downright bullish.

Airbus VP of Sales John Leahy said the company expects the Asia-Pacific region to buy almost 10,000 airliners worth $1.3 trillion over the next 20 years. According to Reuters, Leahy said he expects the region to surpass the U.S. as the busiest place for air travel in that time. Rapid urbanization and economic growth are combining to create a huge middle class in Asia and that will translate into Asia-Pacific becoming the most important market for the industry.

Federal Budget Plan Includes Aviation User Fees

The Obama administration's 2013 budget proposal, released on Monday, includes a fee of $100 per flight for some general aviation aircraft, which drew a quick response from GA advocacy groups. AOPA, the National Business Aviation Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, and EAA all protested the plan. The proposal exempts all piston aircraft, military and public aircraft, air ambulances, aircraft operating outside controlled airspace, and flights that begin and end in Canada. Nonetheless, "AOPA finds little solace [in the piston exemption]," said AOPA President Craig Fuller. "In nations where user fees have been introduced, the fees have grown." However, in the bigger election-year picture, the proposal may not get far, anyway.

According to Reuters, the budget proposal is "expected to go nowhere in a divided Congress and is widely seen as more of a campaign document that frames his economic pitch to voters and seeks to shift the focus from deficits to economic growth." Reuters said the plan reflects the campaign effort to promote "economic fairness" and spread more of the tax burden to wealthier Americans. NBAA and other groups said they would lobby representatives in Congress to derail the plan. "Over the past several years, the general aviation community has worked with Congress to successfully beat back a number of bad ideas proposed by the White House," said NBAA President Ed Bolen. "We can do it again by getting everyone active and engaged with their elected officials."

AVwebBiz: AVweb's Business Aviation Newsletter

Have you signed up yet for AVweb's no-cost weekly business aviation newsletter, AVwebBiz?

Delivered every Wednesday morning, AVwebBiz focuses on the companies, the products and the industry leaders that make headlines in the business aviation industry, making it a must-read.

Add AVwebBiz to your AVweb subscriptions today by clicking here and choosing "Update E-mail Subscriptions."

 
Avemco Insurance || Avemco.com
Blood, Sweat & Years
Avemco Insurance Company's rock-solid financial strength has earned them an A+ (Superior) rating from A.M. Best for over 30 years. That means you can get the protection you want at a time when you need it more than ever!

Learn more.
 
The Top Reporter on Our Crack Staff ... Is You! back to top 
 

Question of the Week: Pilot Confidence and Competence

This week's question comes from an AVweb reader who wants to know about your confidence as a pilot.

Dave Coriaty asks, "At what point in your flying career did you honestly feel to be at your peak of competence in all piloting situtations?"
(click to answer)

Last Week's Question: Results

Want to see the current breakdown of responses? Take a moment to answer the question yourself, and then you can view real-time results.

What's On Your Mind?

Have an idea for a new "Question of the Week"?
Send your suggestions to .

NOTE: This address is only for suggested "QOTW" questions, and not for "QOTW" answers or comments. (Use this form to send "QOTW" comments to our AVmail Editor.)

AVweb's Newstips Address ...

Our best stories start with you. If you've heard something 255,000 pilots might want to know about, tell us. Submit news tips via email to newstips@avweb.com. You're a part of our team ... often, the best part.

 
Diamond Aircraft
Find Out Why Leading Flight Training Schools
Fly Diamond Aircraft!

Diamond Aircraft offers the only complete modern fleet of technically-advanced training aircraft, along with model-specific flight training devices and a safety record that is second to none. Call now to find out why leading flight training schools around the globe fly Diamond Aircraft.
 
New on AVweb.com back to top 
 

Forty-Seven Years in Aviation: A Memoir; Chapter 10: Strategic Air Command, Part 2

Assigned to a like-new KC-97 Stratotanker at MacDill AFB in 1956, Dick Taylor learned much about the plane just from flying it in front of thirsty B-47s: from the trivial (it never spent much time in its namesake, the stratosphere) to the essential (take lots of engine oil on a long trip).

Click here to read the 10th chapter.

During the 1950s, the Strategic Air Command (SAC) was the ultimate deterrent to nuclear war, the keeper of the peace and no doubt had a quieting effect on the rattle of Russian nuclear sabers. Considering SAC's world-wide responsibility, security was a huge player in day-to-day operations at every installation, and access to flight lines was very limited. Chain-link fences topped with barbed wire and warning signs that couldn't help but get one's attention delivered a strong message: It was not only against the rules to enter these highly sensitive areas without being checked in, it was potentially dangerous.

We didn't see much of the animals and their handlers during the day but these "stealth dogs" were on patrol all night, moving silently in the shadows, ready to do serious damage to anyone who shouldn't be there. Every pedestrian and vehicle entrance to the ramp was guarded by armed Air Police personnel who checked flight-line badges, perhaps one of the first large-scale applications of photo ID confirmation. Random checks were carried out by highly trained penetration teams whose mission was to gain flight-line access using phony ID badges, the most outlandish of which was an individual who managed to get through a gate with the image of an ape on his badge ... you can bet a head or two rolled when that break in security was discovered. There were stories of bodily injury (and some live-fire incidents) sustained by pseudo-infiltrators who pushed their entry attempts a little too aggressively.

The first KC-97s, fresh out of the factory, were delivered to the 306th Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill AFB in 1951. When I climbed aboard one of these tankers in 1956, it was as close as I ever got to flying a brand-new military airplane; it smelled new and looked new, inside and out. The flight crews and the maintainers had obviously taken very good care of their new charges.

Most of the line training for new tanker pilots was OJT, acquired in the process of flying refueling missions, the occasional training flight and a lot of personal advice and suggestions from our Aircraft Commanders. Crew assignments were most likely made at random because the officers who made the selections didn't know much more about us than our names. Shortly after I returned from the KC-97 simulator course at Palm Beach, I was assigned to the flight crew commanded by Captain Jimmy Stewart. Lt. John Umstead was our navigator, M/Sgt "Flossy" Johns was our flight engineer, T/Sgt Floyd Gambel was the radio operator, and T/Sgt Jack Whisnant flew the boom. We flew together for about a year and a half, including two 90-day deployments to Morocco.

The KC-97 was, for its time, a rather large airplane. Its wings spanned 141 feet, it was 117 feet long and the vertical stabilizer topped out at a little more than 38 feet. (Not all hangar doors could accommodate that height, so the vertical tail was hinged and could be folded onto the horizontal stabilizer so the airplane could be moved inside when necessary.)

A direct descendant of the B-29 Superfortress, the KC-97 might be best described as a B-29 with an upper deck, larger tail surfaces, more powerful engines and a refueling boom. The "double bubble" two-deck shape is apparent in this photo of a KC-97 in flight:

Conceived as the C-97 Stratofreighter and intended to transport cargo and troops, the addition of large cylindrical deck tanks and a boom pod in the tail changed the airplane to a tanker and changed the designation to KC-97.

All the jet fuel in these tanks and four more in the lower compartment plus all the avgas in the airplane's wing tanks could be transferred to a bomber if necessary ... does the phrase "expendable crew" come to mind?

The pilot seats were accessed by walking around either side of the engineer's station and the "front office" was well-arranged so that the two pilots and the flight engineer could work together as a team to operate the airplane. One set of throttles was handy to both pilots, and the engineer had a duplicate set at his left hand. Notice the steering wheel in front of the left-hand pilot seat -- no more throttle-jockeying or delicate braking required to keep the airplane straight on the ground -- Boeing had incorporated nosewheel steering in the KC-97. All the command radios and autopilot controls were located on the wide, center console.


The engineer sat sideways, behind and between the pilots, facing to the right side of the airplane. He had a panel full of instruments, switches and knobs in front of him, a panel to his left and overhead (circuit breakers and engine controls), and another sub-panel for managing the aerial refueling systems; all told, the engineer was responsible for 200-odd indicators, valve positions, switches and the like. The small, round, analog, engine instruments critical to takeoff were placed in groups of four in the engineer's direct line of sight (left center in the photograph at right) and were installed so that when full power was being generated all the needles pointed straight ahead, i.e., to the engineer's left; the FE could tell at a glance if any of the four engines was not pulling its weight.


Another unique component of the engineer's panel took the guesswork out of managing the KC-97's fuel system (there were two independent fuel systems, one to deliver avgas to the tanker's engines, the other for offloading fuel to a receiver airplane). At the extreme lower left of the FE's panel are the four fuel-valve selector switches that controlled fuel flow from the airplane tanks to the engines; by rotating the knob until the red lines on the switch indicated the desired routing through the valve, the engineer had a clear picture of where the fuel was coming from and where it was going.

The KC-97 was powered by four Pratt & Whitney R-4360 engines, the largest air-cooled radial engines ever put into production. (One R-6000 was built as an experimental engine, but the power-to-weight ratio was so unfavorable the project was abandoned ... goodbye, big radials; hello, lighter and much more powerful gas turbine engines).


Truth be told, the R-4360 was four 7-cylinder radial engines bolted together in a spiral pattern around a common crankshaft -- no wonder it was nicknamed "the corn cob."

It may have looked rough on the outside, but when this engine was properly set up and managed it ran smooth as silk ... 28 cylinders on a common crankshaft provided a lot of power impulses. It was not uncommon for the engineer to pull the props back to 1100-1200 RPM in a long-range cruise configuration; at that rotational speed, you could see the nuts on the prop domes turning.

If there had been a prize for the airplane engine with the largest number of moving parts, the R-4360 would have won, hands down.

At 2700 RPM and 60" manifold pressure (normal takeoff power settings), the R-4360s developed 3500 hp each, but the supercharging that almost doubled sea-level atmospheric pressure would have caused detonation, very high cylinder-head temperatures and eventual engine failure; the problem was solved by injecting a water-alcohol mixture into the cylinders to cool the engines when they were operating at full power. (See sidebar above-right about the B-47's water-alcohol injection system.)

Its virtues were many, but the KC-97 had two weak points, both of them involving the propellers. The original blades were steel with hollow cores filled with neoprene, but over time centrifugal force compacted the neoprene in the outer extremities of the blades. The resulting imbalance and heavy vibration occasionally caused a blade tip to separate, sometimes resulting in the entire prop assembly breaking loose and taking an adjacent engine or propeller with it ... disaster guaranteed. The problem was exacerbated by the long, slow, climb profiles that required abnormally high power settings for extended periods of time.

Applying an abundance of caution, SAC dictated that each and every KC-97 prop blade must undergo a dye-penetrant inspection for cracks at the conclusion of every flight and a visual inspection by the flight crew using magnifying glasses as part of each preflight inspection procedure. The problem was eventually resolved by refitting all the tankers with solid metal blades.

The second serious problem showed up in the propeller pitch-control system, which was prone to a malfunction that would permit the blades to go -- without warning -- to flat pitch in a matter of seconds ... the dreaded "runaway prop." This was a double whammy; not only did the affected propeller stop producing thrust, it was now generating roughly the same amount of drag as a solid disc 17 feet in diameter. There was precious little a crew could do except fly as slowly as possible to reduce drag and hope the engine held together until they could get the airplane on the ground. The eventual fix for this problem was the installation of a pitch-lock system that recognized the onset of an overspeed condition and slammed the door, so to speak, on any further increase in RPM ... and KC-97 crews breathed a bit easier.

The Stratotanker (a rather euphemistic name for an airplane that seldom flew higher than 15,000 feet) was designed to operate at a maximum takeoff weight of 155,000 pounds, but on occasion we loaded the airplanes to the SAC-decreed maximum of 175,000 pounds. These missions called for large offloads to the bombers, even if we had to dip into our onboard supply of avgas. The J-47 jet engines on the bombers didn't care much which type of fuel they were fed; they probably could have burned olive oil if push came to shove. (However, the R-4360 certainly did care; see sidebar at above-right.)

It was easy to identify a taxiing KC-97, even when it was out of sight: The brakes had a distinctive, high-pitched squeal that simply couldn't be mistaken for any other airplane. And when a taxiing tanker was visible, the trail of light-blue oil smoke gave it away. The R-4360s were great engines, but they were known to leak a bit of oil now and then; my AC, Jimmy Stewart, would chide me (tongue in cheek) now and then if he couldn't find a fresh oil stain on my cap, a clear indication that I hadn't ventured into the main wheel wells during my preflight inspection. An anonymous mechanic once said, "The R-4360 didn't leak oil; what you saw was nothing more than the normal functioning of its outstanding external lubrication system."

In any event, our engines consumed a lot of lubricant; we seldom changed the oil, we just kept refilling the tanks. Each engine had a built-in 40-gallon oil tank (that's not a typo; big engines require big oil tanks) and with great foresight, Boeing had equipped the KC-97s with a 100-gallon reserve tank from which the engineer could pump oil to any of the engines in flight. If that weren't enough, when we flew across the pond we carried an additional 55 gallons of oil in a steel drum strapped down on the upper deck ... and at the end of the flight most of it had been used.

[Continued next month.]



To send a note to Richard and AVweb about this story, please click here.
More articles, stories and fiction about the joy of aviation are found in AVweb's Skywritings section.
// -->

 
The Eclipse Jet Experience
Eclipse Aerospace Invites You to the Eclipse Jet Experience
Come see and fly the world's most fuel-efficient twin-engine jet at The Eclipse Jet Experience. Enjoy one hour of ground school on the Eclipse's avionics systems. Then take to the skies with an Eclipse pilot to truly see what the Eclipse Jet is all about: getting to your destination quickly, safely, and efficiently. For more information, or to schedule your Eclipse Jet Experience, click here.
 
Opinion & Commentary back to top 
 

AVweb Insider Blog: Drone Tech Gets Creepy

Drones are much in the news lately, and it seems that each new story we publish describes remarkable progress, some of it a little on the creepy side. On the AVweb Insider blog, Paul Bertorelli examines two developments that could just as easily tip toward the dark side.

Read more and join the conversation.

AVweb Insider Blog: What's EAA Up To?

Building out its base, that's what. And the only way to go is toward a broader, more general interest aviation audience that's not interested only in homebuilding. But on the AVweb Insider blog, Paul Bertorelli asks if that doesn't make it look just like AOPA? And do we need to belong to both?

Read more and join the conversation.

 
Safelog || The World's Most Trusted Electronic Pilot 
Logbook System
Safelog Is the World's Most Trusted
Electronic Pilot Logbook System!

Suitable for student pilots through senior captains, Safelog features legendary flexibility and ease of use. Available for PC, iPhone, iPad, Android, web, Mac (through emulation), and more. Stuck with some underperforming other logbook? Join thousands of others by taking advantage of our complimentary transition service and step up to the power, value, stability, and professionalism of Safelog. Try a demo or learn more at Checkride.com.
 
AVweb Media: Look, Listen, Laugh and Learn back to top 
 

Video: Where's My Flying Car?

Original, Exclusive Videos from AVweb | Reader-Submitted & Viral Videos

A practical flying car with everyman usability has so far eluded the public, but we may have already been introduced to a design that could lead to a breakthrough. Some of the major challenges of producing a point-to-point simple and safe to operate vehicle are technological in nature. Autonomous navigation (enter the destination, press a button, and allow the vehicle to navigate, communicate with, and autonomously avoid other aircraft) may be one key to safely organizing masses of flying vehicles in the same airspace. And as society progresses, the gap between the dream and reality may be shrinking.

Don't see a video screen?
Try disabling ad blockers and refreshing this page.
If that doesn't work, click here to download the video directly.

Video: CTLE Light Sport Police Aircraft

Original, Exclusive Videos from AVweb | Reader-Submitted & Viral Videos

There's a new eye in the sky over Tulsa these days, and it's keeping an eye on things for the local sheriff's office for about 10 percent of the cost of a helicopter. AVweb's Russ Niles spoke with Roger Crow of Echo Flight Resources about the Flight Design CTLE law-enforcement platform based on a light sport aircraft.

Don't see a video screen?
Try disabling ad blockers and refreshing this page.
If that doesn't work, click here to download the video directly.

 
AVbuys || AVweb Stories About Great Deals in Aviation
Fly More for Less
Visit the AVbuys page for discounts, rebates, incentives, bargains, special offers, bonus depreciation, or tax benefits to help stretch your budget. We're helping you to locate and view current offers instantly, with a direct link to sponsors' web sites for details.

Click for the resource page.
 
Your Favorite FBOs back to top 
 

FBO of the Week: Shelby County Airport (Alabaster, Alabama)

Nominate an FBO | Rules | Tips | Questions | Winning FBOs

Our latest "FBO of the Week" ribbon goes to the FBO at Shelby County Airport (KEET) in Alabaster, Alabama.

AVweb reader Joe Barnhart shared his recent experience there:

My daughter and grandkids recently moved to Birmingham, Alabama. On our first trip to visit, I chose Shelby County Airport because of the low fuel price and the relative proximity to my daughter's home. Upon arrival, not only did I find the best fuel price in the Birmingham area but a first-class airport and FBO facility. On top of that, everyone was as friendly as I've ever encountered. Not only did the FBO bring a tug to park my Bellanca Viking; they put it under a covered tie-down at absolutley no charge! I'll definitely be back.

Keep those nominations coming. For complete contest rules, click here.

AVweb is actively seeking out the best FBOs in the country and another one, submitted by you, will be spotlighted here next Monday!

 
Aviation Safety || The Journal of Risk Management and Accident 
Prevention || Subscribe Now and Receive a Bonus Gift!
Are You Ready for Anything?
With Aviation Safety, you're more than ready. Sharpen your technique, understand your options, and get down safely.

Subscribe now and receive a bonus gift!
 
Reader-Submitted Photos back to top 
 

We Want to See Your Vintage Photos

Hearty thanks to everyone who saw our editor's footnote in a recent installment of "Picture of the Week" noting that we haven't seen many vintage submissions lately — and made time to send us some! We don't have many (just a handful), but we've spent the last couple of weeks squirreling them away, hoping we'll get enough to photos from the days before digital cameras to do an "all-vintage" installment. If you've got some classic photos lying around you'd love to scan and share with a 100,000 or so of your closest friends in aviation, please — submit them here. (As always, you'll have to be a registered AVweb user to upload photos.)

Picture of the Week: AVweb's Flying Photography Showcase

This week's winning photo comes from Allan Davies of Helens, Merseyside (U.K.). Click here for the rest of this week's submissions.
 
Traditional Tactics Need a Fresh Approach
Doing the same thing and expecting different results is the definition of insanity. Isn't it time to initiate a digital marketing program with AVweb that will deliver traffic and orders directly to your web site? Discover several new and highly successful marketing options to use in lieu of static print or banner campaigns. Click now for details.
 
Names Behind the News back to top 
 

Meet the AVwebFlash Team

AVwebFlash is a twice-weekly summary of the latest news, articles, products, features, and events featured on AVweb, the world's premier independent aviation news resource.

The AVwebFlash team is:

Publisher
Tom Bliss

Editorial Director, Aviation Publications
Paul Bertorelli

Editor-in-Chief
Russ Niles

Contributing Editors
Mary Grady
Glenn Pew

Webmaster
Scott Simmons

Contributors
Kevin Lane-Cummings
Jeff Van West

Have a product or service to advertise on AVweb? Your advertising can reach over 225,000 loyal AVwebFlash, AVwebBiz, and AVweb home page readers every week. Over 80% of our readers are active pilots and aircraft owners. That's why our advertisers grow with us, year after year. For ad rates and scheduling, click here or contact Tom Bliss, via e-mail or via telephone [(480) 525-7481].

Click here to send a letter to the editor. (Please let us know if your letter is not intended for publication.)

Comments or questions about the news should be sent here.

If you're having trouble reading this newsletter in its HTML-rich format (or if you'd prefer a lighter, simpler format for your phone or handheld device), there's also a text-only version of AVwebFlash. For complete instructions on making the switch, click here.

Aviate. Navigate. Communicate.