AVwebFlash Complete Issue: Volume 18, Number 35a

August 27, 2012

By The AVweb Editorial Staff
 
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AVflash! NTSB's Video of Reno Crash back to top 
 

NTSB Video Shows Reno Crash Sequence

The NTSB is meeting today (Aug. 26, 2012) to determine a probable cause of the crash at the National Championship Air Races in Reno on Sept. 16, 2011 that resulted in the deaths of 10 people and injured more than 60. Jimmy Leeward's highly modified P-51, the Galloping Ghost, went out of control near the home stretch pylon and crashed a few feet from a premium ramp seating area. Leeward and eight others died at the scene and a ninth spectator died later in hospital. The role of the departure of the left trim tab has been a major factor in the investigation and video released by the NTSB last week shows the aircraft was clearly out of control before the part separated from the aircraft, although that doesn't mean it wasn't damaged or disabled before it fell.

The video shows the aircraft aggressively bank 93 degrees before leveling and pitching up hard enough to throw the tail wheel out of its housing. As the aircraft climbs and rolls, the trim tab can be seen falling away. The NTSB has already issued recommendations on improving the safety of the races, which will be held this year starting Sept. 12.

Video: Reno Crash Video Shows Trim Tab Loss After Pitch-Up

Original, Exclusive Videos from AVweb | Reader-Submitted & Viral Videos

The NTSB released a spectator video of the September 16, 2011 crash of Jimmy Leeward's modified P-51 at the National Championship Air Races in Reno. The board is meeting August 26 to determine a probable cause.

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Try disabling ad blockers and refreshing this page.
If that doesn't work, click here to download the video directly.

 
Bose® A20™ Aviation Headset
Bose® A20® Aviation Headset
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Remembering Neil Armstrong back to top 
 

Neil Armstrong Dead At 82

Neil Armstrong, the civilian astronaut who became the first human to set foot on another celestial body, died Saturday from complications from a heart bypass operation he underwent two weeks ago. He was 82. Armstrong lived with his wife Carol in Cincinnati. There was no immediate word on the plan for remembering the self-described "nerdy engineer" who did his utmost to avoid the hero worship the world nevertheless bestowed upon him. It's safe to say Armstrong carried the dreams of the world and the prestige of his country with him (and Buzz Aldrin, of course) when he saw where the Eagle's guidance system had picked for a landing site, snapped off the automatic system and manually guided the Lunar Excursion Module over a crater full of boulders to the relative safety of the Sea of Tranquility. That's when he uttered the second most famous line of the mission: "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." It had 30 seconds of fuel left.

Armstrong was notoriously reclusive and snappish with the fans who continued to approach him even 40 years after the mission. He stopped signing autographs in the 1980s when they started showing up in for-profit memorabilia shows and auctions. He rarely made public appearances and among his most recent was at the National Business Aviation Association convention in 2010 where he allowed the organization to feature him in advertisements supporting business aviation. He was also a vocal critic of the federal government's decision to use Russian spacecraft to ferry American astronauts to the International Space Station and he disagreed vehemently with his former employer NASA that moon flights were not a priority. As for his most famous quote, and arguably the most famous quote of all time, Armstrong believed he had been misquoted. He and NASA at first vigorously maintained that he had said "a" man but after repeated playbacks he agreed that while he intended to say it, he may have dropped the article. He said his preferred presentation of the quote was: "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind."

AVweb Insider Blog: Armstrong's Final Step

One of the most famous pictures of Neil Armstrong shows him smiling broadly in the lunar module after completing the first walk on the moon's surface. On the AVweb Insider blog, Paul Bertorelli wonders whether Armstrong, who died over the weekend, realized he'd spend decades trying to deflect attention away from his personal achievement and toward the 400,000 people who gave him the opportunity to command Apollo 11.

Read more and join the conversation.

 
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Aviation Safety back to top 
 

Airbus Cracks And Cockpit Blackouts

New wing cracks on an Airbus A380 airframe and the continued possibility of full panel blackouts aboard some A320s put Airbus back in the spotlight this week. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Thursday announced that operators of A380 superjumbo aircraft must perform additional "repetitive detailed visual inspections" after a new area of the jet's wing showed signs of cracking. EASA is already working with Airbus to create an approved repair process for another wing cracking issue known to affect existing aircraft. Meanwhile, The Associated Press chose this week to highlight that an electrical problem that has led to instances of extensive failures of instrumentation and avionics aboard Airbus A320 aircraft has yet to see fleet-wide correction.

For the A380, Airbus was previously aware of another issue that caused cracking in some wing components aboard existing aircraft. The company has addressed the issue and, together with regulators, is implementing a fix. Also, the A380's wings have had a production redesign that Airbus hopes will prevent that problem from occurring on any newly built aircraft. The new area of concern is an inboard wing bracket that could lead to loss of a panel in flight and Airbus will work with regulators to resolve that issue as well. As for the A320, The Associated Press reports that more than 50 of the aircraft have suffered episodes resulting in multiple electrical failures since the aircraft entered service more than 20 years ago. Half of those episodes resulted in the loss of five of six cockpit displays. One such instance aboard United Flight 731 in January 2008 resulted in loss of cockpit displays and radios. None of the incidents have resulted in a crash. The Associated Press notes that while the manufacturer has created a fix, the FAA gave operators until 2014 to put that fix in place -- meaning that some jets may still be at risk.

 
'The Aviators' || Weekly on PBS - Also on iTunes & Hulu
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The award-winning hit television series airing across the US weekly on PBS (contact your local station), in Canada on Travel+Escape, and overseas on Discovery. The Aviators covers all-things aviation, as our pilot/hosts take you flying with the Blue Angels, on $100 hamburger runs, or exploring aircraft from warbirds to airliners. Seasons 1 and 2 now on iTunes and Hulu. Season 3 coming this fall ... and premiering at AirVenture 2012!

Click here to learn more.
 
Checking in with the Airplane Manufacturers back to top 
 

Cessna Reclaims Speed Title

Cessna says it has reclaimed (from Gulfstream) the distinction of offering the world's fastest production civilian aircraft with a maximum speed increase on its flagship Citation Ten. In an announcement Friday, the company said it is now calling the top speed of the lengthened and updated version of the Citation X .935 Mach, a .015 increase from the figure used when Cessna announced the aircraft at NBAA 2010 in Atlanta. "As our founder Clyde Cessna said, 'speed is the only reason for flying,' so at Cessna we design, engineer, manufacture and fly the fastest civil aircraft in the world –- not for us, but for our customers so they can work faster, more efficiently and get the job done," said CEO Scott Ernest.

The Citation X was the previously claimed fastest bizjet (.92 Mach) until Gulfstream announced its G650 in 2008 with a hair-on-fire rate of .925 Mach. The G650 is on the cusp of certification. The company announced a week ago that the FAA and EASA have finished their flight tests of the aircraft. Deliveries are expected soon after certification. The Citation Ten is scheduled for certification in mid-2013.

Cirrus SR20/22 Trains French Military

Some pilots training as pilots for the French air force and navy will be passing through Cirrus SR20 and SR22 aircraft along the way following a new agreement, Cirrus announced Thursday. The agreement goes through Cassidian Aviation Training Services (CATS), which the French Air Force Flight School has selected for outsourced training. CATS will operate and maintain at least 23 Cirrus aircraft at various French military units. Thirteen SR20s will be used for pilot training, seven SR22s will earn dedicated spots for training "navigating officers arm systems" and three more SR20s will be flown by students at a French naval air station. The first aircraft has already been delivered and deliveries will continue through year-end, with some specific special equipment.

The transaction itself was handled by Cirrus France. According to Laurent Blattner, CEO of CATS, "The Cirrus SR20 and SR22 are the most appropriate aircraft to meet the current needs of the French Air Force and also the most versatile for the future." Each aircraft will include the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System, airbag seatbelts, the Perspective avionics package (by Garmin) and standard equipment. Extra equipment to be fitted in all the ordered aircraft includes a G-Meter and UHF equipment. The Cirrus aircraft will join a fleet of 18 Grob 120s operated by CATS along with 35 TB30 Epsilon aircraft.

 
Bendix/King by Honeywell || Loud and Clear
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ADS-B Readiness — To Go back to top 
 

ADS-B In, Out, And Portable

A new product joining the ranks of ADS-B offerings may have particular appeal to individuals and operators who own multiple aircraft as well as renters who own none, because it's portable. SkyVision Xtreme this week introduced its fully portable ADS-B In and Out system that delivers all ADS-B traffic (in 3-D presentation) and weather "to any display without installation" via Wi-Fi. At under $4,000 the system could be considered a stopgap measure for people who want the added utility but don't want to commit panel real estate to evolving and yet un-required technology. But company principal Harry Sanders told AVweb Thursday that since 2009, his company has never charged for software updates and when ADS-B becomes mandatory in 2020, the system can also by permanently installed.

SkyVision Xtreme has produced ADS-B software products since 2009; its portable system includes a NavWorx ADS600-B, a UAT transceiver, antennae for that unit and GPS, plus mounts. The system works with any Wi-Fi capable device via a free app, meaning pilots can create multiple displays in the cockpit. And the hardware comes packed in a metal briefcase that, when opened, introduces three wires into the cockpit for the antennae and a 12/24V cigarette-lighter plug. More detail is available in this podcast.

Podcast: ADS-B In & Out Portable Solution

File Size 8.2 MB / Running Time 8:54

Podcast Index | How to Listen | Subscribe Via RSS

The hardware requirement for ADS-B is still eight years off, but many of the system's benefits are available now and may be more accessible, more palatable, and more affordable in a portable package. SkyVision Xtreme principal Harry Sanders discusses his company's latest product.

Click here to listen. (8.2 MB, 8:54)

 
GA8 Airvan from GippsAero
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News Briefs back to top 
 

'The Aviators' Launches Third Season

The Aviators, a mostly general aviation-themed documentary lifestyle television series, has wrapped filming for its third season and the first episode will appear Sept. 17 on PBS. In a news release, producer Anthony Nalli said the crew spent 46 days filming in 18 locations to compile a wide variety of segments for the increasingly popular show. "Many months and 36 segments later I'm more excited about The Aviators than I've ever been," Nalli said. "This season picks up where the last left off and continues to break new ground."

In the third season, The Aviators' crew experiences oxygen deprivation, goes flying with North America's largest civilian jet demonstration team and follows Motley Crue's Vince Neil as he learns how to fly. The show is available on 80 percent of PBS stations in the U.S. and Travel and Escape in Canada. It's also broadcast in about 100 other countries, mostly by Discovery Channel.

App Makes iPad "Mini-HUD"

An Oregon app developer has come up with a unique solution to the problem of spotting unfamiliar airports from the air. Paul Mace is offering ARPort, which he says turns an iPad, iPod or iPhone into a "mini-HUD" that displays pushpin locations of airports within 25 miles in the field of view of the device's camera. The pilot or front seat passenger points the camera through the windshield and all the applicable airports show on the screen as pushpins. Move the selection icon under the pushpin to get distance and heading and tap on the icons to get airport information.

Mace said the idea for the app grew out of a conversation with a fellow pilot about the frustration of not being able to find airports from the air. Mace said it took a few months of research and fiddling to get the app to work and it still has some limitations. While in the air it may need an external GPS like BadElf or Dual to work properly. It also only works in the U.S. and its territories, although expanding its horizons is under consideration.

 
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The Long Arm of the Law back to top 
 

Student Sentenced For False Log Entries

The prosecution was seeking one year in prison, but a judge has handed down a sentence of four years probation, plus a $100 "special assessment," for a pilot who falsified logbook entries while seeking advanced ratings. According to the U.S. Attorney's office, Fahad al-Daous submitted a logbook containing an extra 90-plus hours pilot-in-command time and more than 41 hours of cross country time that he did not fly, but applied while seeking an instrument rating. The pilot's flight school, Livingston Aviation in Waterloo, Iowa, reportedly began training al-Daous in 2010 and alerted federal officials when it spotted discrepancies between its own records and the pilot's claims. The pilot reportedly later admitted to inflating the numbers. Lawyers on both sides highlighted other considerations that may have influenced the 33-year-old father of three.

According to documents submitted to the court by U.S. attorney Rebecca Goodgame Ebinger, al-Daous sought and obtained his instrument rating using the falsified logbook information. Ebinger wrote that al-Daous then continued to enter fraudulent flight hours while working toward a commercial pilot certificate. The pilot's defense attorney suggested that the pilot may have had limited sources of income and was seeking to avoid the financial burden of purchasing more flight hours. Al-Daous holds dual citizenship in the U.S., where he was born, and Saudi Arabia, where he reportedly has worked as a flight attendant. According to his attorney, al-Daous was living in the U.S., supported by a stipend from the Saudi government, while his wife sought to complete graduate coursework. Al-Daous himself reportedly told FBI agents that he logged twice the number of actual hours flown to save money in pursuit of licenses.

 
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Your Favorite FBOs back to top 
 

FBO of the Week: Apalachicola/Franklin County Regional Airport (KAAF, Florida)

Nominate an FBO | Rules | Tips | Questions | Winning FBOs

AVweb's "FBO of the Week" ribbon goes to Apalachicola/Franklin County Regional Airport (KAAF) in Apalachicola, Florida.

AVweb reader Ray Mozingo told us the FBO staff checked all the boxes in making their recent visit a pleasant stopover:

Flew down for a weekend of fishing. The FBO met us when we landed and helped us unload and get to the terminal. Offered us hanger space if we needed. Got plane fueled while we were loading and getting flight plan. Looking forward to going back and meeting with them again! Went out of their way to be helpful.

Keep those nominations coming. For complete contest rules, click here.

AVweb is actively seeking out the best FBOs in the country and another one, submitted by you, will be spotlighted here next Monday!

 
Traditional Tactics Need a Fresh Approach
Doing the same thing and expecting different results is the definition of insanity. Isn't it time to initiate a digital marketing program with AVweb that will deliver traffic and orders directly to your web site? Discover several new and highly successful marketing options to use in lieu of static print or banner campaigns. Click now for details.
 
The Top Reporter on Our Crack Staff ... Is You! back to top 
 

AVweb's Newstips Address ...

Our best stories start with you. If you've heard something 255,000 pilots might want to know about, tell us. Submit news tips via email to newstips@avweb.com. You're a part of our team ... often, the best part.

 
The Lighter Side of Flight back to top 
 

Short Final

Royal Flying Doctor Service was flying a B200 IFR out of Broken Hill, Australia and had a young student doctor in the right seat, who was unfamiliar with flying and for whom English was a second language. As the flight progressed, the pilot noticed the student becoming more and more uncomfortable and, after a normal landing, noted an undue amount of relief on the student's face.

Pilot:
"Why are you so relieved?"

Student Doctor:
"Because we survived the emergency."

Pilot:
"Err, what emergency?"

Student Doctor:
"You know. I heard you on the radio talking about 'my big dilemma.'"

(She had misheard the call sign "Mike Victor Lima" ... .


Duane Stace
via e-mail

Heard Anything Funny on the Radio?

Heard anything funny, unusual, or downright shocking on the radio lately? If you've been flying any length of time, you're sure to have eavesdropped on a few memorable exchanges. The ones that gave you a chuckle may do the same for your fellow AVweb readers. Share your radio funny with us, and, if we use it in a future "Short Final," we'll send you a sharp-looking AVweb hat to sport around your local airport. No joke.

Click here to submit your original, true, and previously unpublished story.

 
Names Behind the News back to top 
 

Meet the AVwebFlash Team

AVwebFlash is a twice-weekly summary of the latest news, articles, products, features, and events featured on AVweb, the world's premier independent aviation news resource.

The AVwebFlash team is:

Publisher
Tom Bliss

Editorial Director, Aviation Publications
Paul Bertorelli

Editor-in-Chief
Russ Niles

Webmaster
Scott Simmons

Contributing Editors
Mary Grady
Glenn Pew

Contributors
Kevin Lane-Cummings
Jeff Van West

Ad Coordinator
Karen Lund

Have a product or service to advertise on AVweb? Your advertising can reach over 225,000 loyal AVwebFlash, AVwebBiz, and AVweb home page readers every week. Over 80% of our readers are active pilots and aircraft owners. That's why our advertisers grow with us, year after year. For ad rates and scheduling, click here or contact Tom Bliss, via e-mail or via telephone [(480) 525-7481].

Click here to send a letter to the editor. (Please let us know if your letter is not intended for publication.)

Comments or questions about the news should be sent here.

If you're having trouble reading this newsletter in its HTML-rich format (or if you'd prefer a lighter, simpler format for your phone or handheld device), there's also a text-only version of AVwebFlash. For complete instructions on making the switch, click here.

Aviate. Navigate. Communicate.