AVwebFlash - Volume 12, Number 28b

July 13, 2006

By The AVweb Editorial Staff
 
Share Your Thoughts on 
Aviation Headsets Share Your Thoughts on Aviation Headsets
Pilots have many choices when considering aviation headsets. So we'd like to know: What features lead you to purchase? How do you choose between brands? In short, we want to know what's important to you. Please take a few moments to complete this survey and help influence the future of the aviation headset industry. Go to survey.
 
Cargo Flying Examined back to top 
 

The Top Headlines From AVweb's Expanded, Illustrated News Coverage At AVweb's NewsWire

Cessna Aircraft - Reason #?

Air-Freight Operators, A "Culture Of Risk"?

Unsafe practices are common in cargo operations, according to a three-part investigative series that ran in The Miami Herald this week. Shorter versions of the story were widely reprinted in newspapers around the country. The Herald says that on average, one pilot per month dies in a freight-hauling accident, making it the deadliest form of commercial flying in the U.S., and the FAA is lax in overseeing the operators. "Experts say the very profile of the industry -- older planes, less-experienced pilots, longer hours, overnight flying, dangerous weather -- adds safety hurdles," says the Herald. Further, "companies ... sometimes blatantly skirt safety rules -- and get away with it." FAA Administrator Marion Blakey declined to be interviewed for the story. "While a formal study ... has not been done, the FAA is aware of the higher accident rate in this type of operation," the FAA wrote in reply to written questions from the newspaper. According to the story, "cargo pilots are dying in large numbers. ... cargo planes are falling from the sky ... [cargo pilots] work in a pressure-cooker environment to deliver goods on time, often flying in icy, hazardous weather." Often NTSB reports blame the pilots, the story says, while downplaying other factors such as sub-par operating practices and equipment malfunctions.

NTSB Cargo Crash Data Questioned

The Herald says its reporters spent nine months researching the story, and in checking thousands of pages of documents, found 12 fatal cargo crashes that had not been counted in NTSB statistics. By the Herald's analysis, there have been 69 fatal crashes and 85 deaths since 2000 in cargo operations. The 12 uncounted by the NTSB occurred during positioning flights, when there was no actual cargo aboard, and thus were classified differently. The newspaper also said that in the course of its investigation, it filed Freedom of Information Act requests for FAA files, examined NTSB dockets, conducted interviews across the country, and reviewed government reports, lawsuits, industry memos, safety studies and news reports. The newspaper believes its conclusions are clear and strongly supported. The Herald says its findings echo those reported in a 2000 study at the National Aerospace Laboratory in the Netherlands. Those researchers found a higher rate of fatalities in cargo operations than for passenger flights, and concluded that air cargo is more likely to fly at night, using less-experienced pilots and older airplanes. ''Cargo does not complain," the Dutch report said. "While for passenger aircraft the fact that an aircraft does not look safe or feel safe can be a reason not to choose that particular airline, for cargo aircraft this is not the case ... The need for on-time delivery is often very high."

Industry Disputes Critics' Conclusions

"NATA feels the Miami Herald did not give a true picture of the air cargo industry," Lindsey McFarren, research and special projects manager for the National Air Transportation Association (NATA), told AVweb yesterday, in response to a request for comment. "Rather, the Herald focused on a few operators with safety or regulatory problems instead of the hundreds of dependable, law-abiding operators who complete, without incident, numerous flights every single day and night." Stan Bernstein, a spokesman for the Regional Air Cargo Carriers Association, told AVweb, "The article is so poorly written and intended only to sensationalize it is hardly worth a comment. ... Lots of statements made; where are the facts?" McFarren, of NATA, also said, "The Herald concentrated predominantly on operators with a history of violations that the authors determined was a factor in fatal accidents, apparently even when the NTSB investigation found other factors were more significant. NATA is supportive of the FAA taking strong action against any operator who willfully and repeatedly violates regulations. However, the Herald has an obligation to the public to present a balanced picture of the industry. Their failure to include information on the many safe and reputable operators leaves readers with unfortunate misconceptions about our industry."

 
Sino Swearingen's SJ30-2 Business Jet The SJ30-2 Is the World's Fastest Light Business Jet
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The Sound Of One Wing Flapping -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Manned Ornithopter Flies In Toronto

If a wing flaps in Canada, and nobody's paying attention, does it make a stir? Luckily for aeronautical engineer James DeLaurier, who last Saturday saw his one-seat ornithopter fly for the first time, a reporter at The Toronto Star who shares his fascination with flapping flight got the story out. The aircraft flapped its way into the air (with a boost from a small jet engine), climbed to about 3 feet above the ground, and sustained flight for 1,200 feet and 14 seconds. It returned to the runway and tipped over onto its nose, damaging the gear, reportedly the result of an encounter with a crosswind. But it beat by two seconds the Wright brothers' first flight, and that was good enough for DeLaurier. "It is a perfect day," he told the Star after the flight. "If I have the big one now, I'll die happy." The pilot, Jack Sanderson, was fine. DeLaurier says the ornithopter now will likely be repaired and then retire to a museum. To fly farther, it would need a bigger wing, and that would require a bigger source of money. Roll control also needs modification, he said.

DeLaurier's Path To Enlightenment

For DeLaurier, a recently retired professor, the quest to fly the ornithopter took 30 years. "I hadn't planned on this taking most of my career, but I don't regret it," DeLaurier told The Star. "It has been exciting and interesting. Also it's been a worthy project, a worthy quest. You know that age-old saying: 'What's the meaning of life?' Quite frankly, life has meaning if you measure yourself against a worthy goal. And for an aerospace engineer -- who loves aviation history -- this has been a worthy goal." DeLaurier says he was inspired by Leonardo da Vinci and the early pioneers of flight. He started working on his ideas back in the 1970s, and by 1991 had built a remote-controlled ornithopter. The full-size aircraft was built in 1996 and has undergone testing and tinkering ever since.

The story in the Star -- the only news about the flight that we could find -- was written by Debra Black, a staff reporter. Black wrote in a separate story that she shared DeLaurier's fascination with the "flapper." She first met him back in 1984, when she was a young freelancer. Over the years she wrote about his quest several times, and the two became friends. "Somewhere along the way," she writes, "I became equally obsessed with the ornithopter, wondering when it might be finished, if it would ever fly." And when the test flight was set for Saturday morning, she knew she had to be there. "As I waited ... I realized I was just as anxious as [DeLaurier] ... and I was supposed to be an objective bystander." Black concludes that she's not sure what it was about the story that kept her interest. "I suppose it's the same thing that fired the imagination of Leonardo da Vinci and all others who dreamed of flying like a bird -- a wish for airborne freedom."

 
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   Visit Aircraft Spruce & Specialty at EAA AirVenture Booths #1022-1029
 
News Briefs -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Sino Swearingen Expands As Jet Nears Delivery

Sino Swearingen Aircraft Corp. announced last week it will expand its operations in San Antonio, Texas, building a 220,000-square foot, $20 million manufacturing plant and adding 850 jobs, doubling its workforce. The company is gearing up to start cranking out 100 copies per year of its SJ30-2 business jet, with first delivery expected by the end of this month. As of last November, at the NBAA annual convention, the company said it had over 300 orders for the airplane, totaling $1.5 billion, and no end in sight. "Orders are accelerating into the stratosphere," said company spokesman Gene Comfort. The new plant is expected to ready for operation sometime next year. The seven-seat SJ30-2 will cruise at 560 mph, with a range of 2,500 nm, and burn 95 gph at 45,000 feet, the company says.

Seawind Rolls Out First Flight-Test Aircraft

The first conforming prototype of the Seawind amphibian is complete and ready to start flight tests, the company announced on Monday. Testing should be complete and a certified Seawind amphibian ready for market by this winter, company spokesman Bill Poirier told AVweb yesterday. "A lot of the certification testing is already done," he said. All the components, the seats, the gear, are already set, he said. The prototype will undergo spin testing, and is being fitted with a recovery chute. Because there is so much work to do, the prototype won't appear at Oshkosh, Poirier said, but he hopes to be showing it at the AOPA Expo in Palm Springs in November. Financing is secure through certification, he said. The company has private funding as well as a guaranteed loan of $2.8 million from the Province of Quebec.

Flight tests will include VFR land and water operations, and flutter and spin testing. These tests will determine the performance specifications including rate of climb, V speeds, and takeoff and landing distances. The prototype will also test IFR capabilities and the three-axis autopilot, as well as the FADEC engine controls. Certification is concurrent with Transport Canada and the FAA. Assembly has begun on article 002, and parts manufacturing is underway for 003. "As soon as the second prototype is finished, we expect to have completed the flutter and spin regime," said Seawind's President Richard Silva. "At that point we will be confident that no significant changes will be required, and we can safely ramp up production." The four-seat Seawind is selling for $324,900 and up. About 77 copies have been ordered.

 
New Bags from Zuluworks Zuluworks Adds Three New Bags to Its Line-Up!
Introducing the Oryx Roller Office, the Topi Shoulder Pack, and the Mongoose Essentials Bag. Whether you're just going up for a quick spin or setting out on a week-long adventure, Zuluworks has all your bag needs covered. Prices starting at $29.95. To see the complete line and order direct, visit the Zuluworks web site.

   Visit Zuluworks at EAA AirVenture Booth #4159
 
News Briefs -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Effort To Change Age-60 Rule Intensifies

Airline Pilots Against Age Discrimination (APAAD) has hired Patton Boggs, a high-powered Washington, D.C., lobbying firm, to power up their campaign to get two bills through Congress that would let them keep flying till age 65 (without having to seek employment with a foreign airline), The Hill reported yesterday. Fifty pilots are expected to come to D.C. next week to lobby their representatives in person, the APAAD told The Hill. So far, the bills have gained support, but not much momentum. Both the FAA and the Air Line Pilots Association have made clear they are content with the age-60 rule as it is, leaving it up to pilots to organize and lobby on their own. Efforts to prove in court that the rule violates age-discrimination laws have so far failed. The Professional Pilots Federation (PPF) also has been working to change the rule. Bert Yetman, PPF president, said last month that as the time gets closer for ICAO to allow older captains of foreign carriers to fly into the U.S. -- starting Nov. 23 -- it may be easier to convince those in Washington that it's ludicrous to allow foreign pilots ages 60 to 65 to fly in our airspace, but not U.S. pilots.

NOTE: Watch AVweb's podcasts in the coming weeks for an interview with Dan Brannan, who is running against Duane Woerth for president of ALPA in October. If Brannan wins, will ALPA's position on age-60 change? AVweb is looking for answers.

NTSB Wants Tougher Icing Rules For Turboprops

It may be tough to think about icing in the middle of July, but that's their job at the NTSB, and on Monday the safety board asked the FAA to do more to prevent icing incidents in turboprop airplanes. The NTSB wants all operators of Saab SF340-series airplanes to install an icing-detection system and to instruct pilots to maintain a minimum operating airspeed if icing is encountered or expected. Crews should exit icing conditions as soon as performance degradations prevent the airplane from maintaining that airspeed. Further, the board would like the FAA to require operators of turboprops to instruct pilots, except during intermittent periods of high workload, to disengage the autopilot and fly the airplane manually when operating in icing conditions. More research needs to be done, too. The FAA should convene a panel of specialists in airplane design, aviation operations and human factors, including folks from NASA, to determine if it would be feasible to require the installation of low-airspeed alert systems in airplanes operating under Parts 121 and 135.

 
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   Visit Teledyne-Continental Motors (TCM) at EAA AirVenture Booths #96-102
 
News Briefs -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Father, Three Children Killed In Fiery Piper Crash

The pilot of a Cherokee Six was flying on Saturday afternoon with four of his children to High Valley Airport, a private field in the North Georgia hills, where they were going to spend the weekend in a cabin. The 2,000-foot grass runway is about 2,800 feet above sea level. According to reports from pilots who witnessed the crash, the landing was long and fast, the Six bounced a bit, and near the end of the runway, facing a fence and trees, the pilot tried to go around. He failed to gain altitude -- the flaps may have stayed down, and perhaps a turn was made -- and crashed into a house off the end of the runway. The airplane caught fire. The pilot was able to escape and extract his 13-year-old son from the flames, but both already were burning. Three girls in the rear of the airplane, ages 11, 7, and 4, perished. Rescuers were quickly on the scene and heard cries for help, but were driven back by the intensity of the heat. The pilot later died, the boy remains in critical condition. The pilot had been flying a little over a year. The family was from South Carolina. The pilot's wife had stayed home with their year-old son.

Cincinnati Airport Saved From Meigs' Fate

For 20 years, civic leaders in Blue Ash, Ohio, have coveted the undeveloped acres that surround Blue Ash Airport, operated by the city of Cincinnati. But did they take bulldozers to the runways in the middle of the night? No, instead they came to a compromise that allows the GA airport to stay open, while handing over some of that green space for the citizens of Blue Ash to enjoy. They'll get 115 acres of parkland, with gardens, trails and an aviation museum. "Everybody gets something out of this deal," Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory told the Cincinnati Enquirer. Blue Ash will pay $37.5 million to Cincinnati for the deal, which still needs to be confirmed by both sides. "Mayor Mallory and Blue Ash Mayor Robert Buckman have shown extraordinary foresight and leadership in crafting this solution," AOPA President Phil Boyer said. Cincinnati will continue to operate Blue Ash Airport. It will improve the runway, reconfigure the taxiway and relocate the hangars and airport businesses.

 
Noise Reduction from LightSPEED Hear the Difference with a LightSPEED Headset
"The audio quality exceeds any headset I've tried," states Bing Lantis, President of Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing. The Mach 1 integrates tiny high-fidelity speakers, giving pilots the best quality sound. Get the rich sound of a concert hall with the Mach 1 or the Thirty 3G. Fly with crystal clarity and full sound, plus improved intelligibility of radio and intercom audio. To order, contact a LightSPEED dealer or call (800) 332-2421 (PST business hours). View the 60-second video clip!

   Visit LightSPEED Aviation at EAA AirVenture Booths #2019 & 2022-2023
 
News in Brief -- Full Issue back to top 
 

On The Fly...

An Osprey V-22 en route to England's Farnborough Airshow made a precautionary landing in Iceland after experiencing compressor stalls in an engine...

Former Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta has joined Hill & Knowlton, a global communications consultant firm, as vice president. Mineta will be based in Washington, D.C....

When a DC-9 and an Airbus collided on the ramp last year in Minneapolis, it was caught on tape. That tape is now released online in an ABC News report...

The ASDE-X surveillance system, which enhances ground control, is now operating at St. Louis and Atlanta airports. There are now seven airports equipped, of a total of 35 planned...

Leaders from government and industry will meet to discuss business aviation in New York City July 24-25 at the 11th annual Corporate Aircraft Transactions Conference...

Sennheiser says it will introduce a new headset, the HMEC 460, with enhanced features and performance, at EAA AirVenture later this month.

AVweb's Newstips Address ...

Drop us a line. If it caught your attention, it will probably interest someone else, too. Submit news tips via email to newstips@avweb.com. You're a part of our team ... often, the best part.

AVweb's Homepage Is Being Redesigned

Watch changes come alive at http://www.avweb.com/ where features and links will be gaining functionality, daily. Explore and you'll soon find: the return of our popular no-cost Classified Advertising section; a new and improved forum for readers of AVweb Columns and Features; and more elegant and intuitive drop-down menus throughout the site (easier navigation, less clutter). For a more personal experience, use the Register/Login button (found in the top right of every AVweb page) to log in. And please be patient. It will take time before some of the features are fully functional. For AVwebFlash readers -- our mailings will now arrive to your inbox from avweb@e.avflash.com. The change means your requested AVweb newsletters may suddenly be blocked by a spam filter. To guarantee safe passage, please add that address (or the domain @e.avflash.com) to your e-mail whitelist, safe list, or address book.

We'd love to know what you think of the site! While we may not be able to answer every e-mail directly, we do appreciate your comments, your suggestions, and -- if you have time -- your bug reports. We've set up a special form for your feedback, which can be found here.

 
Going to AirVenture Oshkosh? Don't Forget to Pick Up Your AeroShell Poster
Stop by AeroShell AirVenture Booth #4085 in Hanger D and hear the latest news from AeroShell. And while you're there, don't forget to pick up your poster. But come early — they go fast! Find out more about AeroShell.

   Visit AeroShell at EAA AirVenture Booths #4085-4090 & 4013 and Combo L
 
Features -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Podcasts

Friday: Check AVweb.com tomorrow for the latest in-depth interview. Visit AVweb's list of podcasts, or subscribe free to receive them automatically. AVweb's Friday podcasts offer interviews with key industry players. It's information you won't hear anywhere else ...

New Articles and Features on AVweb

BRAINTEASERS
Quiz #109: Instrument Failure Is An Option
Flying on the gauges is easy. Instructors make it seem hard by covering up instruments with sticky notes. They're not being jerks but, instead, are simulating instrument failures. Show that you're prepared for failure by acing this quiz.

AVweb's Business AVflash

HAVE YOU SIGNED UP yet for AVweb’s NO-COST twice monthly Business AVflash? Reporting on breaking news, Business AVflash also focuses on the companies, the products and the industry leaders that make headlines in the Business of Aviation. Business AVflash is a must read. Watch for a Business AVflash regular feature, TSA WATCH: GA IN THE "SPOTLIGHT". Sign up today at http://www.avweb.com/profile/

 
Do You Know Who Aviation Insurance Brokers Represent?
The fact is that many private pilots don't understand that brokers do not represent Avemco. Yet many brokers say they represent the entire aviation insurance market. Avemco wants to make sure that the aviation insurance consumer understands that they have a real choice. Call Avemco now at (888) 241-7891 for fast, accurate answers about aviation insurance or for an immediate quote. You may be surprised at what you learn. Online too!

   Visit Avemco at EAA AirVenture Booths #1159-1160
 
Your Favorite FBO's -- Full Issue back to top 
 

FBO of the Week: MERIDIAN, TETERBORO, NJ

Nominate an FBO | Rules | Tips | Questions | Winning FBOs

AVweb's "FBO of the Week" ribbon goes to MERIDIAN, TETERBORO at KTEB, Teterboro, NJ.

Offering up Meridian, ROBERT APENS told us, "FLYING IN FROM CANADA IN THE CIRRUS FOR AN "I LOVE NEW YORK" JULY 4TH WEEKEND THE PEOPLE AT THIS FBO IMPRESSED MY GIRLFRIEND WITH HOW NICELY THEY TREATED US AMONG ALL THE JETS. SHE ASKED IF MY 'OTHER PLANE' WAS A GULFSTREAM! GREAT PRICE ON 100LL..."

Keep those nominations coming.

Click here to nominate your favorite FBO and here for complete contest rules

AVweb is actively seeking out the best FBO's in the country and another one, submitted by you, will be spotlighted here next Monday!

[t]
 
The 2006 New Piper Mirage Offers Serious Sophistication
Avidyne's Flightmax Entegra Integrated Flight Deck is standard equipment on the New Piper Mirage. Three flight displays, moving map, Garmin GNS 430, autopilot, color radar system, and dual Air Data/Attitude and Heading Reference System (ADAHRS) combine to provide serious sophistication for a higher level of confidence. Click here for complete information on the New Piper Mirage.

   Visit the New Piper at EAA AirVenture Booths #72-75 & 79-82
 
QOTW -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Question of the Week

Answer This Week's Question | Results of Last Week's Question

PREVIOUS RESULTS ***

Last week, AVweb asked about your level of emergency preparedness: We wanted to know how many of you have landed on non-traditional surfaces — grass, dirt, water, and the like.

As it turns out, a full 55% of those who responded have landed on grass. At the other end of the spectrum, 14% of you said you'd never landed on anything but tarmac

How did the other 31% of AVweb readers answer? For the final results of last week's question, click here.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTION ***

Starting this week, our "Question of the Week" will remain open for only seven days — from Thursday morning to the following Wednesday. After Wednesday, we'll close the polling to make way for a new weekly question. (You'll still be able to view the poll results in our archive, even after a "QOTW" expires.)

First Question under the new polling system:

Heavy iron and big bucks — are professional pilots overpaid?
Click here to share your opinion


Have an idea for a new QOTW? Send your suggestions to qotw@avweb.com.

NOTE:
This address is only for suggested QOTW questions, and not for QOTW answers or comments.
Use this form to send QOTW comments to our AVmail Editor.

 
Attention, Piper Owners and Pilots!
The Piper Flyer Association (PFA) provides parts locating, tech support, a monthly member magazine, online forums, national and regional events, an annual convention, seminars, and more. With a one-year membership for $39, access the needed information to expand your knowledge and get more enjoyment from owning and flying your Piper aircraft. The PFA is located on the Waupaca Municipal Airport in Wisconsin, just 35 miles NW of Oshkosh. For more information, and to request a sample copy of the magazine, click here.

   Visit the Piper (and Cessna) Flyer Associations at EAA AirVenture Booth #3126
 
Avidyne Introduces Large-Format Version of MHAS6000
Avidyne has a large-format version of the MHAS6000 Multi-Hazard Avoidance System featuring the Avidyne FlightMax® EX5000 Multi-Function Display (MFD) and TAS600 Series active surveillance traffic system. It joins the FlightMax EX500 version as a comprehensive situational awareness package available immediately for retrofit installation in most general aviation aircraft with savings of up to $3,000 over individual system purchases. For complete details, go online.

   Visit Avidyne at EAA AirVenture Booths #2098-2101
 
POTW -- Full Issue back to top 
 

Picture of the Week

Submit a Photo | Rules | Tips | Questions | Past POTW Winners

With AVweb's new design making its first public appearance this week, we've been a bit busier than usual.  Thankfully, we've had plenty of reader-submitted photos to help relieve the stress.  Unfortunately, the combination of a hectic schedule and slightly-lower-than-usual submissions means we'll have a light edition of "POTW" this week.  (Not to worry; we'll be back with more photos in this same space next Thursday — assuming, that is, that you do your part and submit some photos!)

This week's top photo comes to us from Roy Caton and Laurie Spencer of Cedar Hill, Missouri.  Congrats to you both — we'll get two official AVweb baseball caps in the mail to him right away.  (You will make sure Laurie gets hers, right, Roy?)

*** THIS WEEK'S WINNERS ***

click for a larger version

Used with permission of Roy Caton

"Spirit of Boise"

Roy Caton of Cedar Hill, Missouri helps launch AVweb's new format today — just as he launched the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic a couple of weeks ago.  "It was an honor to be asked to be the first balloon aloft with the flag," writes Roy.

And while we appreciate Roy's balloon, we should also give proper thanks to photographer Laurie Spencer, who snapped Roy's elegant ascent from her own Wild Horse Casino balloon.

Great job, guys — and thanks for sharing the photos!

 
AVweb continues to receive a large number of excellent images for our POTW contest. Here are some of the runners-up.  Due to privacy issues, AVweb does not publish e-mail addresses of readers who submit photos.
 

medium | large

Used with permission of Harper Poling

"Round Engines"

Harper Poling of Aurora, Oregon returns this week with another photo from Evergreen, Washington.  You seem to be hitting a lot of fly-ins, Harper — any chance you'll come to AirVenture and visit us as the AVweb booth?

 

medium | large

Used with permission of Mike Lawie

"Saturday Morning Breakfast Run"

Mike Lawie of Muskegon, Michigan photographed "my buddy Jim on his way to a fly-in breakfast in Houghton Lake."

Mmmm, breakfast.  Did Jim bring anything back for the rest of us?

 

medium | large

copyright © J. Glenn Pew
Used with permission

"There She Blows!"

Speaking of AirVenture, we ran across some nifty goodies while migrating the site over to its new digs — including this spirited paint job photographed by AVweb editor-in-chief Glenn Pew at Oshkosh last year.  And since it's a short edition of "POTW" this week, we thought we'd share it with the rest of you.

Excited yet?

(We are.)


To enter next week's contest, click here.

A Reminder About Copyrights: Please take a moment to consider the source of your image before submitting to our "Picture of the Week" contest. If you did not take the photo yourself, ask yourself if you are indeed authorized to release publication rights to AVweb. If you're uncertain, consult the POTW Rules or send us an e-mail.

 

AVWEB APPRECIATES YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT OF OUR SPONSORS,
WHO BRING YOU TODAY'S NEWS AND FEATURES AT NO COST TO YOU

If You Think "Bargains" Are Something Alien to Aviation — Think Again!
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When Was the Last Time Your Plane Recorded Your Flight Times?
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AVweb Announces AVweb Flight Explorer Personal Edition 5.0, Online Now!
New features include: FAA airport delays; enhanced terrain/elevation map depictions and updated Airways; NAVAIDs; Fixes; Special Use Airspace; Sector boundaries; Flight Service Stations; and more. Current subscribers will need to download and install the new version of AVweb Flight Explorer. For more information about the AVweb Flight Explorer upgrade, check out the FAQ page.

Worried About Busting A Reg? You Should Be!
It's all too easy with today's tightened rules and enforcement. Join the smart pilots who trust Aviation Safety to keep them aware and in the air. Discover this informative, instructive monthly that sharpens your savvy and air readiness. For big savings from the regular rate, subscribe now.

Need a Ride to Oshkosh? Have an Extra Seat Flying to Oshkosh?
PilotShareTheRide.com is the perfect site to share the ride with someone — in your plane or in theirs. Like AVweb, the site and services are at no-cost to you — ever! So go share a ride to Oshkosh. With the price of fuel, it's a win-win! Click here.

Order a CO Guardian CO Detector in the Hope You'll Never Have to Use It!
Models from portable to panel-mount units. Order online.
   Visit CO Guardian at EAA AirVenture Booth #3064

Light Plane Maintenance Goes Over the Engine Basics of Crankcases in the August issue. Also highlighted: Cessna Fuel Tank Venting; Tire Changing; Grounding and Bonding; and Wiring. If you like to work on your aircraft, this publication will pay back the subscription cost in no time. Order online.

 
Names Behind The News back to top 
 

AVwebFlash is a twice-weekly summary of the latest news, articles, products, features, and events featured on AVweb, the internet's aviation magazine and news service.

Today's issue was written by news writer Mary Grady (bio).

Click here to send a letter to the editor. (Please let us know if your letter is not intended for publication.)

Comments or questions about the news should be sent here.

Have a product or service to advertise on AVweb? A question on marketing? Send it to AVweb's sales team.

If you're having trouble reading this newsletter in its HTML-rich format (or if you'd prefer a lighter, simpler format for your PDA or handheld device), there's also a text-only version of AVwebFlash. For complete instructions on making the switch, click here.

Freedom, independence, responsibility.