AVwebBiz Complete Issue: Volume 7, Number 31

August 5, 2009

By The AVweb Editorial Staff
 
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Top News: New FAA Rule for Icing on Transports back to top 
 

FAA Requires Automated Icing Systems On Transport Airplanes

The FAA on Tuesday changed its certification standards for transport category airplanes to require either the automatic activation of ice-protection systems or a method to tell pilots when they should be activated. "We're adding another level of safety to prevent situations where pilots are either completely unaware of ice accumulation or don't think it's significant enough to warrant turning on their ice protection equipment," said FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt. The new rule requires that airplanes must have an effective way to ensure the ice-protection system is activated at the proper time. The FAA has previously required the activation of pneumatic deicing boots on many aircraft models at the first sign of ice accumulation, a rule that has been controversial among pilots, some of whom believe they should wait for ice to form before activating the boots. This new certification standard avoids relying on the pilot alone to observe whether the airplane is accumulating ice, the FAA said, and it applies to all types of ice-protection systems, not just the boots.

The new rule applies to new designs. There is no requirement to modify existing airplane designs, unless they undergo significant changes. However, the FAA is considering a similar rulemaking that would cover aircraft not affected by this rule. Under the revised standards, new transport aircraft designs must have one of three methods to detect icing and to activate the airframe ice-protection system: an ice-detection system that automatically activates or alerts pilots to turn on the ice protection system; a definition of visual signs of ice buildup on a specified surface (e.g., wings) combined with an advisory system that alerts the pilots to activate the ice protection system; or identification of temperature and moisture conditions conducive to airframe icing that would tip off pilots to activate the ice protection system. The standards further require that after initial activation, the ice-protection system must operate continuously, automatically turn on and off, or alert the pilots when the system should be cycled. Click here for the full text of the new rule.

 
Business Aviation Will Help Companies Not Only Survive
But Prosper During the Current Financial Crisis

To be your most productive, and your most efficient, you must keep flying. Because in so doing, you will emerge from these times even stronger than before. And you will replace the uncertainty that surrounds many, with the confidence and courage to light the way for all. Visit CessnaRise.com.
 
Oshkosh Forges Parternships, Opens Dialogues back to top 
 

In A Quiet Oshkosh Corner, Progress With TSA

AirVenture at Oshkosh gets lots of attention for the spectacular aircraft and aviators it attracts, but in a less visible way, it's also a place to get things done. Everybody is gathered in one place, out of their offices and in a collegial atmosphere, and plenty of meetings are scheduled where decisions are made and the cause of GA is advanced, without much fanfare. One of those meetings took place on Friday afternoon, when EAA and AOPA staffers met with TSA and the Bureau of Customs & Border Protection (CBP) to discuss ways of improving border crossings without imposing unnecessary burdens on general aviation aircraft. The goal of the meeting was not to change policies, but to open the channels of communication. Randy Hansen, of EAA, explained to the federal officials that under current rules, GA aircraft operators must get two different approvals from two different agencies with different procedures and forms.

"We'd like to see the two systems married up under the Department of Homeland Security," Hansen said, "with the data transferable between outgoing and incoming approvals, and either TSA or CBP handling both types of approval." The TSA officials came to Oshkosh, in part, to better understand GA and its concerns, EAA said.

AOPA, WAI Expand Collaboration

Groups of all kinds across the GA spectrum seem to have become convinced this year that collaboration, rather than competition, is good for everybody, and this week at AirVenture we saw a number of announcements about new relationships. One of those was between AOPA and Women in Aviation, International (WAI), who said on Thursday at Oshkosh that they will work together to strengthen GA and attract more women to the industry. "America's women are a tremendous audience for general aviation and are extremely important for our industry's growth," said AOPA President Craig Fuller. "They currently make up only 6 percent of the total pilot population, so the more we can do to encourage women to bring their enthusiasm and talents to aviation, the stronger we will all be." Peggy Chabrian, president of WAI, said her group will work with AOPA on its General Aviation Serves America campaign, and the two groups will have a stronger presence at each other's events.

AOPA will feature an all-new "Women's Wing" area, hosted by WAI, at its AOPA Aviation Summit, Nov. 5 through 7, in Tampa. And at the WAI Annual Conference, Feb. 25 - 27, 2010, in Orlando, AOPA will expand its exhibit, present additional AOPA Air Safety Foundation seminars, and award a $3,000 student pilot scholarship for WAI members. "Women in Aviation is looking forward to working closely with AOPA," Chabrian said.

 
New from Lightspeed: You Can Now Stream Full-Quality Music to Your Zulu from Your iPhone 3.0 with No Patch Cords!
One of the long-awaited features the iPhone 3.0 update brings to the iPhone 3G or 3GS and the second generation iPod touch is Bluetooth's Advanced Audio Distribution Profile. This is a match made in heaven for the Zulu, because that profile comes built in — just let the music play! For more information, go to LightspeedAviation.com and click on "newsletter."
 
75 Years of Jeppesen Charts back to top 
 

Jepp Celebrates 75th Anniversary; Partners With Aspen, SOLIDFX

When Elrey Jeppesen in 1934 created the first aeronautical chart, he probably had no idea he was founding a company that would become one of the most well-known in aviation. Since then, the technology has changed a bit, as have the charts, and the company is celebrating its 75th year of traditional charting by partnering with two much newer, non-traditional companies, Aspen Avionics and SOLIDFX. Last week at AirVenture Oshkosh, the three announced agreements to display Jeppesen data on Aspen and SOLIDFX in-cockpit hardware solutions.

With Aspen Avionics, Jeppesen has partnered to aggregate its NavData, obstacle, terrain and cultural data for display on Aspen's Evolution Flight Display products. "We are honored to be the first company to have implemented the Jeppesen integrated database into our products," said John Uczekaj, president and CEO of Aspen Avionics, adding the new partnership "will add tremendous value" to his company's products. The SOLIDFX FX10, meanwhile, will display Jeppesen terminal procedure charting and textual information on an iRex e-book reader. "In SOLIDFX and iRex, we saw partners with the experience and expertise to bring Jeppesen electronic charts to another class of portable devices, making them more accessible to a greater number of pilots," said Thomas Wede, Jeppesen senior vice president and general manager, aviation. The hardware used by SOLIDFX, the iRex Digital Reader 1000S, can be used for reading books and newspapers as a conventional e-book reader when not in the cockpit.

 
Do You Fly an Aircraft You Don't Own?
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Reflecting on the Economy and Moving Forward back to top 
 

GAMA Numbers Show Continued Decline In GA Sales

Sales of piston aircraft dropped 58 percent in the first half of 2009, compared to the same period a year before, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) reported in their quarterly update on Tuesday. Shipments fell from 1,034 airplanes last year to just 434 units in 2009. Business jets were also down, by 38 percent (from 663 to 412), and turboprops showed a relatively upbeat trend, with a drop of only 14 percent (221 to 191). "These are extremely challenging times for all general aviation manufacturers and suppliers," GAMA CEO Pete Bunce said in a news release. "Layoffs continue and our industry has been forced to slow, and in some cases, temporarily halt production lines." However, Bunce added that he is seeing some encouraging signs. "The overall economic picture is showing some signs of improvement, which is a crucial condition for recovery in the general aviation market," he said. "Flight hours are stabilizing, used inventories are beginning to shrink, and our manufacturers are seeing signs of renewed interest in airplane purchases."

Bunce added that he is also encouraged by reports that accelerated depreciation, passed by Congress earlier this year, is stimulating some new orders, and he's hopeful that positive momentum will continue through the end of the year. The total shipments, for pistons, turboprops, and business jets in the first half of this year came to 1,037, a drop of 46 percent from last year's total of 1,918 for the first six months. Total billings fell from $12 billion to $9.26 billion, a drop of 23 percent. Some manufacturers have had to cope with dramatic changes -- Cirrus, for example, delivered 549 airplanes in 2008. In the first half of this year, the total was 121. Mooney delivered 65 airplanes in 2008, and so far this year the total is 5. For the full text of GAMA's news release and a PDF copy of their complete report, click here.

New Aircraft Company To Launch In Wisconsin

Brian MorganMark O'Halloran

Apparently undaunted by the current state of the aviation industry (see today's GAMA story), a pair of entrepreneurs is preparing to build a 600,000-square-foot facility at the Sheboygan County (Wisc.) Airport where they will develop and manufacture a new vertical-takeoff-and-landing jet design. County leaders said the company has potential for "tremendous economic development and job growth," according to the Sheboygan Press, and the state is providing an economic incentive package worth nearly $30 million. The project will also include offices and other facilities at the airport, and could create up to 2,000 jobs, according to the Press. We couldn't reach the company co-founders, Mark O'Halloran and Brian Morgan, by our deadline, but in a talk at Lakeshore Technical College in January, Morgan said he has been working on the jet design for 20 years.

"Now it's time to make that dream come true," he said. "Our aircraft combines jet-speed forward flight with the ability to land in a parking lot." O'Halloran added: "It will give business travelers the freedom to take off and land anywhere, as well as the speed and reach of a jet. In many applications it could replace the helicopter. ... We believe this could be what is called a 'disruptive technology,' a technology that could completely alter the aviation industry and change the playing field forever." According to a post at Brian Morgan's LinkedIn profile, "Flight testing is expected in 2013, FAA certification in 2016, and aircraft deliveries in 2017." The Sheboygan Press celebrated the deal in a recent editorial. The editorial said the company obtained a patent on the jet design four years ago, and added: "While a patent is not a golden ticket or a guarantee, a patent coupled with a business plan and the proper financing is a good recipe for success."

 
If You Own a Cirrus, Or If You Are Considering Purchasing a New or Used Aircraft, Consider This:
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News Briefs back to top 
 

Mission Pilots Champion Kodiak

The Kodiak was purpose-built in consultation with mission organizations (supported this year at AirVenture through EAA's Fly4Life program) to provide a remote area a reliable long-range, short-field, heavy hauler for backcountry operations and this year is beginning to making good on its promise. Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) took delivery of a Quest Aircraft turbine- powered Kodiak earlier this year to meet its need for a larger-payload Cessna 206 replacement that runs on jet fuel for operations in remote areas around the world. The MAF announced at AirVenture Oshkosh it plans to ensure "the reliability and cost efficiency of missionary flights" by replacing 20 of its Cessna 206 aircraft with nine-seat PT6A-powered Kodiaks, or larger Cessna Caravans. As a clean-sheet design built specifically for the wide-ranging environments posed by mission operations, the Kodiak is an aircraft that can take off in under 700 feet at a full gross weight of 6,750 pounds while offering pilots a 1,500-fpm climb rate. It also comes standard with a full three-panel Garmin G1000 integrated avionics suite available with weather and synthetic vision, and can cruise at 179 KTAS at 12,000 feet for more than 1,000 nautical miles with reserves.

Founded in 1945, MAF operates a fleet of 130 bush aircraft in 55 counties. The organization uses the aircraft to transport medical personnel, missionaries, medicine, relief supplies, and to support medical evaluations. Quest Aircraft, has turned out nearly 20 Kodiaks and says it's ramping up production toward a goal of four per month, this year.

 
Jeppesen Pilot Training
Smart pilots never truly fly solo. For 75 years, pilots have taken their aviation partner along for the journey — Jeppesen. Pilots (and future pilots) look to us for the tools and training they need to fly safely and effectively. Throughout your career flight path, you can count on Jeppesen. Choose the learning tools best for you with our integrated system. Learn more at Jeppesen.com/pilottraining.
 
The Top Reporter on Our Crack Staff ... Is You! back to top 
 

AVweb's Newstips Address ...

Our best stories start with you. If you've heard something 200,000 pilots might want to know about, tell us. Submit news tips via email to newstips@avweb.com. You're a part of our team ... often, the best part.

Who's Where? You Tell Us

Get a promotion or a new job? Your colleagues want to know about it, and AVwebBiz can get the word out. Drop us a line about the staff appointment, with a nice recent photo, and we'll do our best to include it in our new section, "Who's Where." The items will be permanently archived on AVweb for future reference, too.

 
You and Your Dollars Go Further in a Diamond
When smart pilots compare safety statistics and resale values, plus maintenance, insurance and operating costs, it's clear that investing in a Diamond pays big dividends. Top that off with Diamond's outstanding performance, luxurious interior and cutting-edge technology, and there's no question — you'll go further in a Diamond.
 
Opinion & Commentary back to top 
 

AVweb Insider Blog: AirVenture — The Day After

So, did everyone at AVweb enjoy AirVenture? Paul Bertorelli did. Even though he's been to a couple dozen of these and didn't get far from his laptop, he still managed to recapture a little of that air show excitement this year. Read all about the cool things he saw (and tire-kicked) at EAA AirVenture 2009 in the latest installment of our AVweb Insider blog.

Read more.

 
Aircraft Ownership and Partnership
Is the cost of flying keeping you on the ground? Explore your options with these money-saving books. Each offers expert guidance on prices, real-world operating expenses, cutting the costs of ownership, and renting vs. owning vs. partnerships vs. leasebacks — including pitfalls to avoid, paperwork, sample agreements, tax tips, financing and insurance, and updated owner maintenance procedures. Check out these and other books at AVwebBooks.com.
 
EAA AirVenture 2009 Oshkosh Round-Ups back to top 
 
 
Traditional Tactics Need a Fresh Approach
Doing the same thing and expecting different results is the definition of insanity. Isn't it time to initiate a digital marketing program with AVweb that will deliver traffic and orders directly to your web site? Discover several new and highly successful marketing options to use in lieu of static print or banner campaigns. Click now for details.
 
AVweb Media: Look, Listen, Laugh and Learn back to top 
 

EAA AirVenture 2009 Photography Round-Up

Here they are, all in one place — seven daily galleries of photos from EAA AirVenture 2009, one bonus gallery (filled with pictures we didn't share during our show coverage), three galleries of photos from the Seaplane Base, and seven incredible zoomable panoramas. (All links open in new windows/tabs.)


EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2009 Photo Galleries:


Our Day at the Seaplane Base:


Panoramic Photos:

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Video Marketplace Spotlight

Classic Cockpits DVDs
Rick Searle Productions takes you behind the stick of some of the world's most incredible classic airplanes — the Douglas DC-3, the PBY Catalina, the de Havilland Vampire, and the Avro Lancaster — in a series of Classic Cockpits DVDs.

Click here to watch the video (and discover other great products) at AVweb's Video Marketplace.

 
You Pay More for the Unbiased Truth — To Ultimately Save More
Yes, Aviation Consumer costs more than other aviation magazines. Aviation Consumer is supported by you, the subscribing consumer, not by advertising. So the editors can be completely truthful to help you make the right decision on products and services. Order online and receive unlimited use of Aviation Consumer's ratings-packed web information database!
 
Names Behind the News back to top 
 

Meet the AVwebBiz Team

AVwebBiz is a weekly summary of the latest business aviation news, articles, products, features, and events featured on AVweb, the internet's aviation magazine and news service.

The AVwebBiz team is:

Publisher
Timothy Cole

Editorial Director, Aviation Publications
Paul Bertorelli

Editor-in-Chief
Russ Niles

Contributing Editors
Mary Grady
Glenn Pew

Features Editor
Kevin Lane-Cummings

Webmaster
Scott Simmons

Contributors
Jeff van West

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