AVweb Features

Turbo Troubles »

The turbocharger is a useful part of a pilot's toolbag. When flying an airplane with one installed, it can increase our rate of climb, boost our groundspeed and lift us above a lot of the weather. It also can be used to pressurize the airplane's cabin, allowing us to enjoy a shirtsleeve environment in the flight levels. More

Public Benefit Flying: Get Involved »

For more than 70 years, public benefit flying (PBF) has harnessed the passion of pilots to help others. What began out of abject frustration evolved into what is now thousands of volunteer pilots donating their time, skills and airplanes (owned or rented) to serve others and, incidentally, improve the perception of general aviation, one flight at a time. More

Build It Better »

There are always unknowns in any human endeavor, but in aviation, we must think about the ways we can minimize them. More

Your Refurb: Panel Connectivity for Avionics »

If you're doing an avionics upgrade as part of a refurb, we think wireless avionics integration makes sense, especially as the cost may be as low as $1,000 plus installation. More

Used Aircraft Guide: Piper Apache-Aztec »

Some insist it began production as the world's largest flying sweet potato and evolved into Snoopy crouching as he waited for his supper. The original PA-23, the Apache, seemed almost round and had such modest powerplants that single-engine operation could be hazardous—just as with other twins with small engines. The last versions, the Aztec series, by contrast, are capable load-haulers with very good short-field performance. More

Climb Considerations »

How we chose to perform our climbs should be tailored specifically to the time of day, the weather, the surrounding terrain and/or the traffic. We can chose to maximize the trip's average groundspeed, minimize fuel use or get as high as we can as fast as we can, fuel efficiency be damned. More

The Unflyable Clearance »

14 CFR §91.123 says, "When a pilot is uncertain of an ATC clearance, that pilot shall immediately request clarification from ATC." Complying with the reg seems easy enough, but under pressure of time, heavy weather and busy controllers we are tempted to assume that ATC knows its intentions and to accept a clearance as given. More

AVmail: March 30, 2015 »

Vern Schulze writes: "I am a single-engine aircraft owner and private pilot that only flies VFR. So the following question is based on my 2,000 hours of flying over the past 33 years. My Grumman Cheetah is equipped with the standard altimeter, and my airplane has a Mode C transponder. I also have three GPS instruments, two portable and one panel-mounted. The panel mount is strictly a VFR unit with no WAAS capability. One of the two portables has a WAAS capability. Over the years, flying at 8,000 to 10,000 feet in Nevada, I have noticed some remarkable variations in the altitude reported by the three GPSs versus the altimeter when corrected for barometric pressure. Since most of my flying is in mountainous terrain, these variations that approach 500 feet make me wonder why we rely on altimeter readings rather than GPS altitudes." Click through to read the full text of this letter and other mail from AVweb readers. More

Hand-Propping Demystified »

Most casual discussions of hand-propping begin and end with the admonition "Don't." That's not bad advice, except when there's no other way to start the engine. In fact, hand-propping is a time-honored practice, dating to the beginning of heavier-than-air flight. That it's still employed says as much about the legacy of aviation as it does our ability to manage risk. More

Rust Never Sleeps »

As the average GA fleet age goes well into the 30s, it's time for a voluntary, on-going program of corrosion inspections. More