AVweb Features

The Prop Strike/Sudden Stop »

It's possible to do major engine/accessory damage without obviously damaging the prop by hitting water or heavy, tall grass that stops or slows the running engine. The FAA definition of a sudden stoppage, is the engine stopping suddenly in under one rpm. More

Fly On the 4th of July »

It's the Fourth of July—go fly. On a basic level, it's summer in the northern hemisphere so enjoy it in the air—if you're in the southern hemisphere, it's the dead of winter, you probably haven't been flying enough, so go get some of the rust off. On another level, unapologetically, it's my country's Independence Day, and I think that one of the best ways to celebrate it is by going flying. More

When ATC Says 'Unable' »

Judgment is the cornerstone of the air traffic control profession. This basic trait, common among thousands of successful air traffic controllers worldwide, allows controllers to face a variety of situations—including unusual pilot requests—and act appropriately. More

AVmail: June 23, 2014 »

Richard Herbst writes: "Only a personal injury lawyer would write a Lettre de Cachet like the black adventure story published in USA Today. My sympathies for their reduced ad revenues and declining circulation. But holding public executions and sensational smear campaigns has never worked for any publication. Even the networks hesitate to raise their viewing by attacking privilege. They should know this. Fifty years worth of aircraft accidents looks terrifying to a public with an attention span measured in 30-second spots, but this is what 'USA Today' is gambling on. They hope to boost circulation and redefine themselves as a rag, which they aren't far from in any case." Click through to read the full text of this letter and other mail from AVweb readers. More

A Considered Decision »

A pilot who had been trained in emergency procedures for the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System acted in accordance with his training and saved two lives in a severe turbulence encounter. More

Pilots and Mechanics: Improving the Relationship »

Pilots/aircraft owners and mechanics/shops need each other to survive, yet the love-hate relationship between them seems to wax and wane, depending on the person you spoke with last. Good communications and reasonable expectations are key to keeping things running smoothly. More

Dancing With the Crosswind »

It never seems to fail. You reserve the airplane for an early morning departure for the family vacation. Then the delays add up and you arrive at beautiful Lake Runamuck as the turbulence reaches its glorious maximum, the winds are 270 at 15 gusting to 20, the runway is oriented north and south and is 75 feet wide. More

Used Aircraft Guide: Citabria and Decathlon »

Owners who fancy aerobatics might lust after a Pitts S1 or an Extra 300. But then reality sets in. And that’s why so many owners gravitate toward the Citabria or the Decathlon, starter aerobatic airplanes that turn out to have much more capability than many realized until they take a close look. More

AVmail: May 26, 2014 »

John Benton writes: "A UAV (or any remotely controlled air vehicle) flown under 400 feet still has the potential to easily take down a manned aircraft, particularly if flown near final approaches to airport runways. I'd imagine that the 400-foot altitude limitation would also make low-flying manned aircraft vulnerable, near an airport or not. There seems to be an exploding proliferation of small UAVs that have the potential to exceed 400-feet altitudes. They are flown by novice pilots right out of the box, by hobbyists who should probably know better, and, in this day and age, by people who have no problem with intentionally creating hazards to life and property. Without a transponder aboard the UAV, or a means of the UAV pilot determining his altitude, how can the 400-foot limitation be accurately observed? And how would you be able to see and avoid a UAV if you were aboard a manned aircraft?" Click through to read the full text of this letter and other mail from AVweb readers. More