Oshkosh 2000 Audio Coverage:
Day Four — Friday, July 28

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You will need RealPlayer to hear OSHtalk.

Friday OSHtalk (July 28, 2000) — As the rain showers moved out of AirVenture 2000, OSHtalk was set up by the wing of the Aztec (since the Twin Beech had left) and tried to find enough dry spots for some international visitors to sit down and talk about airplanes. Host Rick Durden was joined by German pilots Ewald Nuspl, Michael Wocke and Werner Servatius. The three had flown Ewald's Cessna TR182 from Germany to Oshkosh, and were kind enough to take time off from their first day at AirVenture 2000 to talk about their flight across the pond. The five-day trip had concluded with their arrival just yesterday, when they parked their Cessna in the North Forty, erected their tents, and met their camping neighbors. Ewald, Michael and Werner all hold German pilot certificates, and two also hold U.S. certificates. They had planned and flown a route that included stops in Norway, Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, and Canada. Enroute, they encountered a Canadian homebuilder who showed them his project he hopes to bring to AirVenture next year. They also made a stop in the wilds of northern Canada where the airport was out of avgas and only got a barge with a supply once a year. (Fortunately, the barge arrived the next day.) They discussed the difficulties of flying general aviation airplanes in Germany, which made the hassles we face in the U.S. seem trivial. Later in the evening, Rick was joined by three South African pilots: Dennis Cronje, Rob Oxley and Penny Wilson. Dennis and Rob described learning to fly in South Africa, operating transports in that country, and some of the procedures followed in the bush, as well as their experiences as homebuilders. Penny explained that she was unable to learn to fly while living in South Africa but learned when she came to the States. The descriptions of the seven written examinations one must take to get a commercial pilot certificate in South Africa will get your attention.

Listen to Friday OSHtalk (running time 66 minutes).