Anthony J. Broderick

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A brief profile of the FAA's Associate Administrator for Regulation and Certification.

Anthony J. Broderick was named Associate Administrator for Regulation and Certification of the Federal Aviation Administration in July 1988, after 17 years of government service.

As head of the agency's Regulation and Certification complex, he is principally responsible for: certification, production approval, and continued airworthiness of aircraft; certification of pilots, mechanics, and others in safety-related positions; certification of all operational and maintenance enterprises in domestic civil aviation; development of regulations; civil flight operations; and certification and safety oversight of some 7,300 U.S. commercial airlines and air operators. These programs have a direct and highly visible impact on every facet of domestic and international civil aviation and are the heart of the nation's air safety efforts. Regulation and Certification programs are carried out by an agency force of approximately 4,300 employees located in Washington headquarters, 9 regional offices, and more than 125 field offices throughout the world. The Regulation and Certification work force is augmented by some 10,000 persons in the private sector aviation community who are designated to perform certain aviation safety functions on behalf of the Federal Aviation Administration. The Regulation and Certification budget is about $350 million per year.

Prior to his appointment, Broderick spent three years as Associate Administrator for Aviation Standards. For three years before that he served as Deputy Associate Administrator for Aviation Standards, having been a Technical Advisor since 1978.

Broderick, who is a private pilot, joined the government in 1971 as a physicist at the Department of Transportation's Transportation Systems Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was an internationally recognized expert on the complex problems of upper atmospheric ozone reduction. He moved to the FAA in 1976 as Chief of the High Altitude Pollution Program Staff in the Office of Environment and Energy. He came to the government from private industry where he was a project manager for optical and electro-optical systems development for seven years.

He has received the Arthur S. Fleming Award (1979) as one of the ten outstanding young men and women in the Federal Service; been awarded by the President the Senior Executive Service ranks of both Meritorious Executive (1982) and Distinguished Executive (1991); and been awarded nine Senior Executive Service Performance Awards, the FAA Superior Achievement Award (1988), and the Secretary's Award for Meritorious Achievement (1989). He was presented a 1992 Aviation Week & Space Technology Aerospace Laurel for Government leadership in assuring strong FAA safety oversight of foreign airlines operating into the U.S.

Broderick is a 1964 graduate of St. Bonaventure University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Physics. He is married, with two children. He and his family live in Warrenton, Virginia.

Be sure to read Scott Dyer's in-depth interview with Broderick about the Bob Hoover incident also here on AVweb!