Eagle 150B: Canards for Our Times »

It's from Australia. It's made from Kevlar and a carbon-fiber honeycomb, has three lifting surfaces, a canopy, a center-mounted control stick and a TCM IO-240B kicking out 125 ponies. One of the things the Eagle 150B doesn't have is a small-plane ride, due to its forward-mounted canard, main wing and aft-mounted stabilizer. Is the Eagle 150B the "better mousetrap" that designer John Roncz hoped for? Check out this pilot report by AVweb's Dave Higdon and see for yourself. More

Icarus Instruments' SatTalk »

Airborne telephones are nothing new they've been around for years, mostly in higher-end turbine equipment with the space to mount them and owners willing to pay the bills. And, airliners have been carrying passenger phones for more than a decade. Yet, "affordable" airborne telephone technology has been slow coming to the lighter end of the general aviation fleet. But, with the advent of the Iridium satellite system and the specialized cellular technologies, piston-twin and -single owners can benefit from an airborne telephone also. AVweb's Publisher, Carl Marbach, takes a look at this market as he prepares to install an Iridium-based system in his Aerostar. More

Overcoming P-Factor »

No, we're not talking about that left-turning tendency on takeoff, but rather the other kind of P-factor that so often preoccupies light plane passengers. In fact, with the possible exception of turbulence, a lack of bathroom facilities is perhaps the chief concern that non-pilots have about flying in small aircraft and sometimes it's a problem for pilots, too. AVweb's Mike Busch evaluates a number of products designed to address such range-limiting concerns. More

'Coupe de Thrill: Aviat Resurrects Monocoupe's Racy 110 Special as a 1950s-Style Hot Rod with Speed and Spunk »

Come with us now, back to those glorious days of yesteryear, as Aviat resurrects a classic 1932 race design, the Monocoupe 110 Special, and upgrades it for the next millennium. The result is a fully aerobatic hot rod for the sky, complete with a pair of fuzzy dice dangling from the overhead. But, as AVweb's Dave Higdon writes in this pilot report, the dice don't always hang straight down. More

Charlie Victor Romeo: Real-Life Cockpit Drama Comes to the Stage in New York City »

AVweb's Peter Yost reviews an unusual New York stage production whose title comes from the phonetic spelling of CVR cockpit voice recorder. The play depicts the human drama that occurred in the cockpit during six aircraft accidents, with dialog faithful to the actual CVR transcripts. Yost credits producer/director Bob Berger for resisting the urge to "dumb down" or take liberties with the technical material. If you're within range of New York, this one's definitely worth seeing. More

LightSPEED 20K Active Noise Reduction Headset »

Since Bose first introduced their $1,000 ANR headset to aviation in 1989, we've been waiting for a headset with the same sublime comfort and spectacular noise reduction but at half price. Headset giants David Clark, Peltor and Telex all jumped into the fray, but all came up short in our judgement. Now, some ex-Tektronix audio whizzes in Lake Oswego, Oregon, have come up with a innovative $439 ANR headset that comes within a hair's breadth of the comfort and quiet of the Bose but costs less than half as much. We rate the LightSPEED "20K" the clear price-performance winner among ANR aviation headsets. They also have an economy model, the "15K", priced at $299. More

LightSPEED Technologies' K-Series Active Noise Reduction Headsets »

Since Bose first introduced their $1,000 ANR headset to aviation in 1989, we've been waiting for a headset with the same sublime comfort and spectacular noise reduction but at half price. Headset giants David Clark, Peltor and Telex all jumped into the fray, but all came up short in our judgement. Now, some ex-Tektronix audio whizzes in Lake Oswego, Oregon, have come up with a innovative $439 ANR headset that comes within a hair's breadth of the comfort and quiet of the Bose but costs less than half as much. We rate the LightSPEED 20K the clear price-performance winner among ANR aviation headsets. They also have an economy model 15K priced at $299 that compares very favorably with the $600 ANRs we've tested. More

LightSPEED Technologies' 25XL Active Noise Reduction Headset »

When LightSPEED Technologies shattered the ANR headset price barrier in mid-1997, the company's model 20K priced just over $400 garnered rave reviews from AVweb and Aviation Consumer, and quickly became the fastest-selling aviation ANR headset ever. A year later, at EAA AirVenture 1998, the company announced a new top-of-the-line $600 model 25K, but engineering and production snags delayed first deliveries for nearly a year. Now renamed the 25XL, LightSPEED's new high-end headset is now in production, and the company is offering a unique trade-in deal for current 20K owners. Is the 25XL worth the extra dough? After flying with one for several weeks, AVweb's Mike Busch offers his detailed critique of the 25XL, and compares it with its lower-priced sibling. More

The Bose Aviation Headset X »

The Bose X (which stands for "ten," not the letter "X") is the latest in Bose's series of Active Noise Reduction headsets. The X is lighter and quieter than the Bose Series II which preceded it. With the X, Bose has abandoned its trademark gel earseals for the traditional foam cushion. They've completely redesigned the ANR system to eliminate more of the low engine rumble frequencies. One 9-volt battery powers the unit, instead of six AAs as on previous models. But one thing hasn't changed: the price. At $995, it's still the highest-priced aviation headset on the market. Is it worth it? AVweb's resident audio maven Joe Godfrey dissects Bose's new headset and compares it to the Series II and the much-less-expensive LightSPEED 20K. More

What a Difference Some Decades Make: Ultralight Turf Turns 20 »

It's been almost 25 years since the first ultralight aircraft made their sometimes embarrassing debut at OSH. The rest, as they say, is history. So historical, in fact, that the industry has created a Hall of Fame installing its first inductees this week at EAA AirVenture '99. AVweb's Dave Higdon reflects on the mature ultralight industry and its 1975 debut. More