Forward This E-mail | Edit Email Preferences | Advertise | Contact | Privacy | Help

  • Text size:

    • A
    • A
    • A

Belite Aircraft, as the name implies, for many years has focused its energy on producing extremely light aircraft designs. At the 2017 Sport Aviation Expo in Sebring this week, company president James Wiebe announced a new model constructed of a material common in the aerospace industry but little used in light general aviation: aluminum honeycomb.

The material is made of thin aluminum sheets bonded over a layer of aluminum honeycomb cells. Sheets of it can be cut into parts and used just like sheets of aluminum or plywood. In this podcast recorded at the show Thursday, Wiebe told AVweb that the point of the new kit isn’t to break new aerodynamic ground but to advance the cause of lightweight construction. The finished weight of the airplane—a two-seat experimental—will be under 400 pounds. It’s a high-wing taildragger and can be fitted with a two- or four-stroke engine. The kit will be available later this year.

L3 Aviation Products - Wednesday Feb. 1st at 4pm EST - Sign Up

The National Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton appears to be in financial trouble and a local congressman said this week he’s investigating complaints of mismanagement. U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, R-Dayton, released his Wednesday letter to NAHF board chairman William R. Harris Jr. stating his office has “received complaints of financial mismanagement and misappropriation of NAHF resources and assets.” Turner requested that the organization turn over an extensive list of documents dating back to 2001. His announcement comes after the hall’s recent controversial decision to move its 2017 enshrinement dinner from Dayton to Fort Worth, Texas, in efforts to boost fundraising. Harris issued a statement Wednesday that he has “complete confidence in our finances,” which have undergone independent audits, the Dayton Daily News reported. As a result of the board’s decision to hold its annual event in Texas, “it is not unexpected that we would undergo extra scrutiny,” Harris stated.

Turner told the Dayton Daily News the NAHF has worked with him in recent years amid financial struggles that threatened to close down the organization, which is based at Dayton’s National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. “Just a few years ago, they approached me with concerns that their finances were so bad that they might close their doors at the Air Force museum,” Turner told the newspaper. “With their recent decision to relocate the enshrinement dinner, the question has arisen again as to the ability to meet their financial needs. I’m very concerned that the long-term viability of the National Aviation Hall of Fame is at risk.” The NAHF operates a public exhibit and Learning Center in Dayton and each fall, announces new enshrinees for wide-ranging contributions to aviation and aerospace.

 

Four more aircraft makes are now approved for the EAA/Dynon avionics Supplemental Type Certificate program. Owners of some Beechcraft, Grumman, Maule and Mooney models can now purchase the STC and install the two Dynon electronic flight information systems, EAA announced this week. The EFIS-D10A and EFIS-D100, which have been made available in the past year for common Cessna and Piper airplanes, can be installed in models on the Approved Model List, which EAA says will continue to expand. 

Under the Accessible Safety STC program, EAA members can purchase STCs for $100 and install the units as primary or backup attitude indicators, connecting them to the aircraft’s pitot-static system. This week’s announcement comes after the recent meeting of FAA and EAA officials in Oshkosh to discuss expanding on the FAA’s moves to allow non-certified, safety-enhancing equipment installations for certified aircraft. 

The list of eligible aircraft now includes:

- Beechcraft Bonanza, Debonair, Musketeer, Sundowner, Sierra, and Skipper

- Cessna 150, 152, 170, 172, 175, 177, 177RG, 180, 182, 185, 205, 206, 207, and 210

- Grumman AA-1 and AA-5

- Maule M-4, M-5, M-6, and M-7

- Mooney M20

- Piper PA-24, PA-28, PA-32, and PA-38

The Dynon units include the 4-inch EFIS-D10A primary flight display and 7-inch EFIS-D100, which come with battery backups and include options for additional flight information such as angle of attack, true airspeed and winds aloft.

Sponsor Announcement
RAPCO DRY AIR PUMPS AVAILABLE AT AIRCRAFT SPRUCE
RAPCO DRY AIR PUMPS AVAILABLE AT AIRCRAFT SPRUCE
The RAPCO line of FAA approved dry air pumps offers quality and performance at a great price. All new pumps have an inspection port for monitoring vane wear which increases safety by helping to determine when replacement is needed. All new RAPCO dry air pumps also have an oil seal to help prevent oil from entering and damaging the pump. RAPCO quality dry air pumps offer exceptional value and are backed by our warranty.

A sluggish end to 2016 will result in production cutbacks for Cessna business jets this year, Textron Aviation said Wednesday. The company delivered 58 Citation jets in the fourth quarter of 2016, down from 60 in the same period for 2015. Meanwhile, deliveries of new Beechcraft King Air turboprops fell from 33 in the fourth quarter of 2015 to 28 in 2016. Fourth-quarter profit fell to $135 million in 2016 from $138 million the year prior. The Wichita Eagle reported that while its midsize Citation Latitude jet has seen success last year, the company will roll back production of other models in the series, which include the Mustang, CJ4 and Sovereign. Textron CEO Scott Donnelly didn’t specify how many Citations are expected to be produced this year, but said some sales in the fourth quarter fell through, the Eagle reported. “We saw a lot of price pressure,” Donnelly said. “We traded out some volume because … we’re not willing to go to the price levels people want us to go.”

The news comes after a year of soft jet sales for Textron, which has been scaling back its workforce. The Wichita-based company restructured in October after announcing layoffs at its regional facilities and launching an early-retirement program. It has a regional workforce of more than 9,000 employees. Efforts to boost sales will focus on the Latitude model, which is expected to see delivery growth, according to the Wichita Business Journal. Meanwhile, two more Citations in the series are in the works. The super-midsize Longitude jet is undergoing flight testing and is on schedule to achieve certification by year’s end, the Journal reported. The larger Citation Hemisphere is under development and is expected to begin test flights in 2019.

Sponsor Announcement
ALT
Safelog — The Last Pilot E-Logbook You'll Ever Need!
Tens of thousands of pilots, from student pilots through senior captains, have come to make Safelog the world's most trusted e-logbook system. Access and update your pilot logbook on PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, Android, and Web. Totals, currency, graphs, instant IACRA, signatures, photos, printouts, and more — all synchronizing seamlessly — mean your logbook is futureproof, safe, and always available. No-cost transition service for users of other e-logbook systems available. Get started now at Pilotlog.com or SafelogWeb.com today!

 

Four more aircraft makes are now approved for the EAA/Dynon avionics Supplemental Type Certificate program. Owners of some Beechcraft, Grumman, Maule and Mooney models can now purchase the STC and install the two Dynon electronic flight information systems, EAA announced this week. The EFIS-D10A and EFIS-D100, which have been made available in the past year for common Cessna and Piper airplanes, can be installed in models on the Approved Model List, which EAA says will continue to expand. 

Under the Accessible Safety STC program, EAA members can purchase STCs for $100 and install the units as primary or backup attitude indicators, connecting them to the aircraft’s pitot-static system. This week’s announcement comes after the recent meeting of FAA and EAA officials in Oshkosh to discuss expanding on the FAA’s moves to allow non-certified, safety-enhancing equipment installations for certified aircraft. 

The list of eligible aircraft now includes:

- Beechcraft Bonanza, Debonair, Musketeer, Sundowner, Sierra, and Skipper

- Cessna 150, 152, 170, 172, 175, 177, 177RG, 180, 182, 185, 205, 206, 207, and 210

- Grumman AA-1 and AA-5

- Maule M-4, M-5, M-6, and M-7

- Mooney M20

- Piper PA-24, PA-28, PA-32, and PA-38

The Dynon units include the 4-inch EFIS-D10A primary flight display and 7-inch EFIS-D100, which come with battery backups and include options for additional flight information such as angle of attack, true airspeed and winds aloft.

Sponsor Announcement
Wings for Humanity || Call (414) 763-5781 to Help
Give the Gift of Life!
Wings for Humanity is a non-profit humanitarian aid organization working in areas of the world where traditional transportation is unavailable. WFH regularly flies medical workers, medications, and supplies into areas where medical assistance and supplies are needed.

Through your donation-in-kind (airplane, car, land, or other items of value), you can help save a life. For more information, call (414) 763-5781 or go to Wings4Humanity.org.

 

The contenders in the international Lunar XPrize have been narrowed down to five finalist teams who will attempt to be the first to launch and land a robot on the moon by the end of the year. XPrize.org, which is offering a grand prize of $20 million sponsored by Google, announced this week that each of the finalists, who were among 16 contestants in 2016 and more than 30 the year prior, were able to obtain launch contracts by the end-of-year deadline. They’ll have until Dec. 31 to send an unmanned lunar lander to the moon, have it travel at least 500 meters and transmit high-definition images and video back to Earth. The contest had originally launched in 2007 with a five-year deadline to make it to the moon, but the viability of the projects resulted in the contest extending its timeframe until this year.

Among the finalists is Moon Express, based at Cape Canaveral, which won launch approval from NASA and the FAA for its lunar rover, which is undergoing testing at Kennedy Space Center. Synergy Moon, a team made up of international members and headquartered in California, says it plans to launch a Neptune 8 rocket with a lander and “at least one rover” off the West Coast. Israeli nonprofit group SpaceIL is developing a small spacecraft it says is “about the size of a dishwasher” that will “hop” on the lunar surface to make the 500-meter requirement. Hakuto, a startup from Japan, designed a four-wheeled rover that will share a launch with finalist Team Indus of India, which also has a small four-wheeled rover that weighs about 11 pounds.

Josh Hoch, age 31, of North Queensland, has been charged in an Australian court with pouring contaminants into the fuel tanks of rival operators, causing engine failures and forced landings. Officials said Hoch, whose Linked In profile describes him as the “owner, director and chief pilot of Hoch Air,” also faked crashes twice, in 2014 and 2015, to collect insurance money, and flew charters without a license for years. Hoch was charged with 342 counts of 14 different offenses, with a maximum penalty of life in prison. “We are lucky over a number of years that an alleged rogue operator like this wasn’t responsible for a disaster,” said Detective Inspector Chris Hodgman. “The pilots [of the sabotaged airplanes] … were lucky to walk away.”

Officials said they are investigating four claims of tampering with aircraft in 2016. In each case, a contaminant was poured into the fuel tanks during the night at Mount Isa Airport. When two of the airplanes powered up, the contaminant caused “catastrophic” damage, and the airplanes were grounded for months. The other two airplanes experienced damage in flight, and the pilots were forced to land. Hoch also was charged with assaulting an aircraft engineer, causing "permanent and life-changing head injuries.” A lawyer for Hoch told reporters the charges are based on “circumstantial” evidence. Bail was set at $50,000, but as of Wednesday morning the bail had not been met and Hoch was still in custody.

Sponsor Announcement
Buy and Download 'Transition to Glass' Now
Transition to Glass
The new flight and navigational display capabilities now at your fingertips are amazing. But matching your needs with the array of available products can be overwhelming. The editors of IFR Refresher and IFR magazine have kept pace with the glass invasion over the years and are pleased to announce a new e-book — Transition to Glass — filled with articles and advice to help pilots purchase, install, and safely master these new miracles of technology.

Buy and Download Now

British European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake has officially opened the Airbus Foundation Discovery Space STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) center in Stevenage next to the Mars Yard test area. Backed and funded by Airbus, the Airbus Foundation and the Hertfordshire Local Enterprise Partnership, the STEM Center will be run in partnership with North Hertfordshire College. Jeppesen and the Joint Aviation Authorities Training Organization (JAA TO) have signed an initial Memorandum of Understanding to determine the potential for co-offering European-based aviation training programs. The agreement will look to integrate JAA TO expertise in multiple fields of aviation safety with Jeppesen’s extensive pilot training, flight dispatch and licensing preparation capabilities. 

Textron’s Bell Helicopter announced the completion of the first fully customized aircraft from its new European state-of-the-art Customization and Delivery Center located in Prague. The customer, Air Transport Europe of Slovakia, recently accepted three newly customized Bell 429 EMS-configured aircraft at Bell Helicopter’s delivery center in Prague. L-3 Aviation Products will hold a webinar, "L-3 Lynx, ATAS and the Future of ADS-B," on Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 4:00 PM EST. Discover the features and future enhancements coming to the transponder-sized Lynx NGT-9000. Lynx is much more than a transponder with its touchscreen display, built-in WAAS GPS, ATAS Traffic Alerting, Terrain and much more. Participants will receive a certificate for an ATAS Traffic Alerting System enablement ($667 value). 

General aviation pilots make IFR takeoffs in reduced visibility and low ceilings on a daily basis. We line up, launch, establish a climb, transition to the gauges and press on with the flight. Assuming there is an approach with adequate minimums at home plate or a nearby airport, we’re confident we can return and land within about 10 minutes should something go sour. If we’re in a single and the engine decides to take the day off, our ability to pick out a good landing site is minimal but, hey, that’s IFR flight any time the weather is down.

Where things get much more serious and the launch versus don’t launch equation looms large is when the visibility gets well below the half-mile ILS minimum. Are we willing to take off in a GA bugsmasher when the vis is 1000 feet? 500? 300? The answer is an exercise in line drawing and judgment. Complicating the issue is that, like another risky endeavor, scud running, very few pilots receive training in actual conditions so the low-vis takeoff concept remains theoretical until suddenly having to confront it. I think most pilots make intelligent decisions when presented with facts and the risks are understood. By the same token, I think that when we pilots are simply told to not do something, we’re like teenagers and sex—we’re going to fall all over ourselves to try it as soon as possible, not always with great success. So, let’s drag the subject of low-vis takeoffs out of the back alleys, into the open. We’ll talk about how to make them and making the decision to launch or wait until the weather improves.

Is This Trip Necessary?

Is it really necessary to go while the weather is down to where we’re going to be on the gauges on the takeoff roll? Potentially, yes. The weather may be forecast to get worse or we decide it’s safer to go now than try to fly in low IFR after dark. Nevertheless, I am reminded of a wise friend who told me that there is no such thing as an emergency takeoff.

Chances are if you’ve been around the block a few times, you’ve had to return and land because a problem developed during the early part of a flight. Nevertheless, the odds that you’ll have to return shortly after an IFR takeoff are low—each time I’ve had to do it, I hadn’t yet entered the clag. The level of confidence in our airplanes and their maintenance is a factor in any IFR departure—and a big one when an immediate return isn’t possible. All of which should factor into your decision to make this takeoff.

As we check off the matters to consider, one high on the list is whether we’ve practiced an ITO—instrument takeoff—under the hood from the moment of brake release in the last few weeks? If not, this should be a no-go. The accident data show that we pilots do things pretty darned well if we’ve practiced them recently. However, if we’ve never done it before or haven’t practiced recently, we pretty much suck. What’s worse, we’re also not very good at honestly evaluating how well we will do when we are about to do something we haven’t practiced in a while.

Each time I’ve made a takeoff with visibility less than 1000 feet, the factor that let me say yes to the risk was that I had a pilot in the right seat who managed the rudders to keep the airplane on centerline. That allowed me to be on the gauges from before brake release so I didn’t have to go through those critical seconds of adjustment to instrument references as the airplane was just leaving the ground.

No other pilot available? Your call. It means that you’ll need to line up perfectly on centerline when you may only be able to see a few stripes (on an FAA-standard instrument runway, they’re 120 feet long and 80 feet apart). Are you going to try to track the runway visually and then transition to the gauges on rotation or go head-down from the beginning of the takeoff roll? Each has risks and benefits—consider them and make a decision early so that you have time to run through the takeoff a few times in your head before you line up.

Gyros

On a vacuum pump, round-gauge airplane, you’ll need to bring the power up to get minimum suction so the heading indicator gyro is up to speed. (Have you checked how much it precesses during the takeoff roll, and in which direction?) Set it to the nearest 10 degrees and set the heading bug there as well, not on the heading you’ve been assigned after takeoff—tracking a heading when the bug is elsewhere can lead to confusion as to which way you should be going.

Make sure you’re on the correct runway. I looked at one low-vis takeoff accident report where a pilot who thought he was on the runway was on a short taxiway. He survived the crash. A friend of mine who thought he was on one runway but was on another, much shorter one, didn’t survive running off the end.

How wide is the runway? Are you confident you can stay on it if you decide to take off head-down? If you stay eyes-outside, how comfortable are you with an immediate transition to the gauges the moment you raise the nosewheel (and the airplane turns left as its rolling friction for directional control is lost)? If you stray from the runway, what is there to hit? Runway lights can do a lot of damage.

About one percent of aircraft accidents involve striking deer or other  wildlife, and most of those happen in good VFR conditions. There’s no data on how many pilots see and avoid deer—you probably won’t be able to on this takeoff—or how many deer see and avoid airplanes. Interestingly, about one percent of aircraft accidents are mid-airs, and you’ve probably spent good money on avionics to cut that risk—but you’ll make a zero-zero takeoff. Really?

Rolling

Initiate the takeoff by holding the brakes, going to full power and assuring the engine indications are where they should be before you let the airplane roll. It's possible you'll end up charging down the runway at an angle rather than right down the centerline, so saving 200 feet on the takeoff roll because you went to full power before brake release may mean you lift off before hitting a runway light. Plus, you won't have to divert your attention to set or confirm power while the airplane is rolling.

Plan for an abort. Are you confident you can keep the airplane on the runway as you accelerate to 60 knots (just over 100 feet per second), chop the throttle and apply maximum braking to a stop?

Plan on having to hold your heading within a degree or two—no overcorrecting on the rudder. When it’s time to raise the nosewheel (you may or may not want to tack on five knots above the book speed to get a clean liftoff), do so smoothly and positively. Establish normal climb attitude, confirm that the wings are level, you’re holding the desired heading and that the airplane is indeed climbing.

The somatogravic illusion—your senses convincing you that you’re climbing when you’re actually flying level and accelerating—is incredibly powerful. It has caused a number of crashes on missed approaches where pilots were convinced they were climbing and flew level into obstructions. I was in the right seat of a Cessna 182RG on a low-ceiling, pre-dawn takeoff when the flying pilot started a slow descent at increasing speed just after he retracted the gear. When I called out the descent, he corrected and said he’d been convinced we were climbing.

Low visibility in fog and mist usually means no crosswind. That’s not necessarily the case with rain or snow. Do you want to add a crosswind to the mix when keeping the airplane dead straight for a few thousand feet is critical?

It takes some time, especially in lower-powered airplanes, to get configured and stabilized in the climb. As the control forces are changing with speed and gear and flap retraction, continue to aggressively monitor the rate of climb, heading and pitch attitude. Then, once the airplane is at your desired climb speed and trimmed, don’t mess with things until at least 1000 feet agl.

Conclusion

Part 91 low visibility takeoffs are legal, so pilots, being mission-oriented, are going to make them. In my opinion, the safest way to approach the subject is not to either blithely dismiss them as no big deal or flatly condemn them; it’s to talk openly about exactly what’s involved and to practice them with an instructor so that a pilot can evaluate the risks honestly and make an informed decision before doing one for real.

Rick Durden holds an ATP with type ratings in the Douglas DC-3 and Cessna Citation 500 series, and is the author of The Thinking Pilot’s Flight Manual or, How to Survive Flying Little Airplanes and Have a Ball Doing It, Vols. 1 and 2.

This article originally appeared in the January 2015 issue of Aviation Safety magazine.

For more great content like this, subscribe to Aviation Safety!

Forward this email to a friend
Tailor your alerts!
Click here to update alerts preferences.
AVweb Insider

I’ve done enough instruction in the Cub now to understand it’s the worst place in the world to do great flight instruction. Ever been in the front seat of one? Super Cubs don’t count and neither do any of the new-age Cub knockoffs. They’re as far from the 1930s ergonomic hell of a J-3 as a garbage truck is from an Audi TT.

Not everyone can even get in the front at all, much less elegantly. I lever my legs across the sill using the ceiling tubes for purchase. Getting out is a lot easier than getting in. Once in, it’s no picnic for me, but it’s torture for people over 6 feet. I’m 5 ft. 8 in. and I’m more or less curled up like a ball-turret gunner. At least nobody is shooting at me. You’d think the visibility over the nose would be better from the front, but it’s not. You still have to crane way up or lean out the open door to see that Bonanza you’re about to taxi into.

The front brakes work better than the rear, though, because they tie directly to the master cylinders rather than being connected through the stretchy cables that attach to the rear heel pedals. Not that it matters. You hardly need brakes in a taildragger at all except for the runup and maybe not even then if you don’t mind doing a rolling runup. I can stay in the front seat for about an hour before I really want to get out and stretch my short legs.

I’ve been checking out a new partner in the Cub this week and it occurred to me that there are only two essential skills to teach. And teach is really the wrong word. I see the instructor’s role as a kind of meat-powered envelope protection while the learning pilot figures out how not to make tire-sized craters on the initial landings and/or find the bottom of a runway-edge ditch for lack of grace on the pedals.

So the one skill almost unique to the J-3 Cub is the ability to judge depth perception, speed and lateral alignment with what are ludicrously inadequate peripheral cues. Looking forward, the pilot in back has a view of the instructor’s fat head—in my case, it blots out and absorbs all light—and the trees and grass whizzing by out the side windows. So the essential skill is learning to imagine where the horizon is and to judge altitude without being able to see anything useful. It’s a marvel of human adaptability that we can do this at all, let alone do it well, for nothing in human evolution equipped us for this.

And don’t even compare this to a modern Cub, where you fly from the front and you can see over the nose. Same for clean-sheet LSA taildraggers. In those, you can do as you were probably taught: Look downrange to the end of the runway to help with depth and altitude perception. For three-pointers in a Cub, that doesn’t work, although it does for wheelies.

The second essential skill is an aggressive dance on the pedals after touchdown. That tired old cliché about flying a taildragger until it’s tied down is more true of a J-3 than of any small rag wing taildragger I can think of. Some biplanes, like the Stearman, are similar. I find that when checking out someone new, the universal tendency is to sweat the three-pointer, then when the bounce is avoided, “phew, made it!” Then the feet go dead. But if left to its own devices, a Cub will happily start careening as it slows down in the three-point attitude and once past maybe 20 degrees off alignment, you’re going for a ride.

In the front, I rest my feet on the pedals and if I don’t feel vigorous input, I intervene. But after a few landings, almost everyone gets the feel of it and for me, there’s no greater satisfaction than sensing that pedal awareness as the new pilot’s feet come alive and the muscle memory sets in. This is a perishable skill, by the way. If I lay off for a while, the perceptions wither and that fine touch for a perfect three-point goes with it.

For as simple as the Cub is and for as much as I’ve flown them, I’m always surprised to learn something new. The other day I discovered that with two people in the airplane and a full tank of gas, it won’t stall if the stall is commenced from near level flight. With full stick back, it just lacks the pitch authority. It will barely get into a mush. But in ground effect, it has more pitch bite and so has no problem getting into the three-point attitude. Burn off half the fuel and it behaves differently.

There’s a payoff or two for the long-suffering CFI in the front seat. When the door is open—which it almost always is in a Cub—the front seat is guarded from the slipstream so the view out the right is unimpeded out and down. From 500 feet, watching a golfer whack one into a sand trap or a shirtless retiree mow crooked rows in his scruffy lawn is the quintessential reason to be a pilot. It’s not the same from the window of a Cirrus.

Although the ADS-B market is choked with options, 2020 Avionics is showing off a new portable unit at the Sport Aviation Expo at Sebring this week. AVweb talked to Steve Cagle about the product.

Belite Aircraft, as the name implies, for many years has focused its energy on producing extremely light aircraft designs. At the 2017 Sport Aviation Expo in Sebring this week, company president James Wiebe announced a new model constructed of a material common in the aerospace industry but little used in light general aviation: aluminum honeycomb.

Picture of the Week
Picture of the Week

Nice airplane but the scenery and composition is what makes this a winner. Sean Wu had his GoPro on the wing of a Schweizer 1-26 when he flew over Byron, California. Beautiful, Sean.

AVweb is the world's premier independent aviation news resource, online since 1995. Our reporting, features, and newsletters are brought to you by:

Publisher
Tom Bliss

Editorial Director, Aviation Publications
Paul Bertorelli

Editor-in-Chief
Russ Niles

Contributing Editors
Mary Grady
Elaine Kauh

Contributors
Rick Durden
Kevin Lane-Cummings
Paul Berge
Larry Anglisano

Ad Coordinator
Karen Lund

Click here to send a letter to the editor. (Please let us know if your letter is not intended for publication.)

Comments or questions about the news should be sent here.

Have a product or service to advertise on AVweb? Your advertising can reach over 225,000 loyal AVwebFlash, AVwebBiz, and AVweb web site readers every week. Over 80% of our readers are active pilots and aircraft owners. That's why our advertisers grow with us, year after year. For ad rates and scheduling, click here or contact Tom Bliss:

Heard anything funny, unusual, or downright shocking on the radio lately? If you've been flying any length of time, you're sure to have eavesdropped on a few memorable exchanges. The ones that gave you a chuckle may do the same for your fellow AVweb readers. Share your radio funny with us, and, if we use it in a future "Short Final," we'll send you a sharp-looking AVweb hat to sport around your local airport. No joke.

Click here to submit your original, true, and previously unpublished story.