Flight Safety / Accidents

Flying Car Crash Cause Determined »

Some tangled parachute lines, a seriously aft C of G and some kind of air turbulence ganged up on a Maverick flying car to send it spiraling into a schoolyard in western Canada in early May. Canada's Transportation Safety Board turned over the investigation to the manufacturer of the aircraft, ITEC, to come up with the cause and the company's COO Troy Townsend traveled to Kelowna, British Columbia, a week later to conduct the probe. By analyzing video from two GoPro cameras onboard the aircraft, plus video shot from the ground by AVweb and airport surveillance camera video, Townsend and pilot Ray Siebring determined at least three independent factors contributed to the stall/spin that ended with the Maverick spinning from an altitude of about 500 feet into the playground fence of a school in Vernon, B.C., on May 10. "Any one of those factors wasn't enough to bring the aircraft down but they all added up together," said Townsend, who has hundreds of hours on the vehicle, which is really just a large powered parachute with a street-legal car as its payload. More

More Flight Safety / Accidents Articles

Germanwings Recovery Effort... »

As investigators probe into the history of first officer Andreas Lubitz, searching for insights into why he apparently crashed a Germanwings A320 into a... More

Photo Gallery: Broken Airbus »

It would appear that the 138 people aboard this A320 that crash-landed at Halifax's Stanfield Airport owe a debt of gratitude to the engineers at Airbus for... More

Air Canada Airbus Landed Short »

The Air Canada A320 that crash landed at Halifax's Stanfield International Airport early Sunday touched down about 1,000 feet before the runway threshold and... More

LSA Earthrounder Killed In... »

A 62-year-old Swiss adventurer who was attempting to fly around the world in an LSA-sized aircraft died Saturday in an accident in Ecuador. Eric Guilloud's... More

Tragedy in the Alps vs.... »

The two have nothing in common except the potential to reenforce the notion that extra regulations mean extra safety. More

Hand-Propping Demystified »

Most casual discussions of hand-propping begin and end with the admonition "Don't." That's not bad advice, except when there's no other way to start the... More