First All-SAF Airliner Flies

A Swedish regional airline is claiming the first flight of a commercial airliner with all the tanks filled with sustainable aviation fuel (SAF). Braathens...

Congress May Block Air Force F-22 Retirement Plan

The Drive says Congress may block the Air Force’s plan to scrap 33 F-22s to save money and begin the process of retiring the...

Dutch Pick Embraer C-390 Over C-130J

The Netherlands has picked Embraer’s C-390 tactical airlift aircraft over Lockheed Martin’s C-130J. The Dutch will buy five C-390s to replace four second-generation C-130H...

SkyWest Hopes To Save Small Market Routes With Charter Subsidiary

SkyWest may have found a neat workaround to sustain scheduled service to small markets while filling the flight decks with its most experienced captains...

Top Letters And Comments, June 24, 2022

This week's letters brought comments from readers about Garmin's place in the avionics market, a 50-year-old altitude record and Amazon drone deliveries.

Shifting Gears With Ivan Gromala

What’s that? A custom-built Zenith STOL CH 701 taildragger? Now that’s something you don’t see...

Chasing The Sun – A Little-Known Piece Of Aviation History

On a side street in the northern-Utah city of Logan, a large plaque celebrates the...
Avsoft International is excited to announce it has signed a contract with Utah State University’s Aviation Technology program, located in Logan, Utah.
Once again, the company will be scheduling appointments with Air Plains experts prior to the show
This was the one and only U.S. Army Air Corps C-41, N41HQ. It's a stock 1938 DC-3 that was requisitioned by General Hap Arnold. It served as his personal transport from 1938 - 1946. The plane was purchased by the Otis Spunkmeyer Cookie Company and flew through 1990s as one of the two Spunkmeyer DC-3s. I was a Captain on this plane in 1995 - 1998. I shot this photo with a Hasselblad 500ELM, 80mm lens on Kodak Portra color negative film, f-8, 1/500th sec. Copyrighted photo by Robert Campbell.
Expecting an airplane to survive tied down in a big blow is a crapshoot at best. Unless you want an insurance check, it's better to move the airplane out of harm's way.

Featured Video

Best Of The Web: The Death Of An Airplane

Although insurance is surely a nice thing to have, no one wants to suffer through the trauma of losing an airplane and cashing the...