Building A Better Oil Filter?

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It looks like an oil filter and it acts like an oil filter but makers of the Tempest Original Aviation Spin-on Oil Filter say this is no ordinary oil filter. In fact, according to spokesman John Herman, this oil filter represents the first technology change in the industry in more than 30 years. The filter incorporates a small, but powerful magnet that traps ferrous particles but doesn't affect instruments. And unlike other magnets that have been tried on oil filters in the past, this one keeps its magnetism at high temperature. "It'll go up to about 450 degrees [F]," he said. The company claims the filter adds extra protection for Continental engines in particular. Filters on Continental engines have an internal bypass valve that allows oil to circulate if the filter becomes obstructed. Continental specifications call for the relief valve to open at about 10 to 14 psi of back pressure. Herman said that until now, no filter manufacturer has been able to meet that spec and their relief valves have typically opened at less than the specified pressure. "That means they could have been going into bypass without you knowing it," he said. That translates to unfiltered oil circulating in the engine. The company claims its new filter is the only one to meet Continental specs. The company doesn't make any claims about extended engine life and nor does the filter extend the time between changes because that's up to the engine manufacturer. For fleet operators, the filter is available in six or 12 packs.