Quieter Mufflers For Training Fleet

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A French company has received EASA and Canadian certification for an aftermarket exhaust system that could substantially reduce noise complaints at training airports. Epagny-based Chabord has developed exhaust systems for Cessna 150, 152 and 172 aircraft it says cut the noise from them by at least half. It has “certified silent exhaust systems” for other small aircraft more common in Europe than in North America, like Jodels and Robins, but it was the small Cessna fleet applications that caught the eye of Michel Beaudoin, the manager of Saint-Hubert Airport in densely populated suburban Montreal. There are four busy flight schools based at his airport and noise complaints are common. “We have had a lot of problems,” he told COPA eFlight.

Armed with pledges from all four schools that they would install the systems, Beaudoin and the City of Longueuil worked with Transport Canada to obtain Canadian certification of the exhausts within a few weeks of EASA approving them. The initial certification is for the ubiquitous 152 and approval for the 150s and 172s is expected to follow. Meanwhile, the company is clearly targeting the U.S. market and certification is expected soon. It will have a booth at AirVenture 2017 in Oshkosh to show the systems, which will sell for about $3,900 U.S.

Comments (3)

Look at all that pipe. Yards of it, in a balanced length header I'm sure. But every square inch of it radiating heat under the cowl. There's a reason Cessna didn't do it: too much surface area transferring heat by radiation in the cowl on the bottom of the engine. When these run in a low airflow situation like an extended taxi time which can be common training new pilots, those cylinders - and the engine oil - will be cooking.

Posted by: Timothy Holloway | July 6, 2017 12:38 AM    Report this comment

I HAVE KNOWN THIS SHALL BE SOME DAY INSTITUTED IN THE LIGHT PLANE FLEET SINCE 1982 WHEN I DISCOVERED THAT THE VAST MAJORITY OF THE NOISE IN THE SINGLE ENGINE PISTON ENGINE AIRCRAFT CABIN NOISE IS EXHAUST NOISE AND EXHAUST NOISE ALONE, AND *NOT* PROPELLER NOISE AS THE FAA AND EVERY OTHER OFFICIAL AGENCY IN THE USA WAS TOUTING AT THAT TIME AND EVER SINCE. COMMUNITY NOISE IS AFFECTED BY BOTH EXHAUST NOISE AND PROPELLER NOISE. THE ONLY TIME THAT PROPELLER NOISE IS A COMMUNITY NOISE PROBLEM IS ON TAKEOFF WHEN THE PROPELLER TIP SPEED IS HIGHEST AND APPROACHES SHOCK WAVE FORMATION. EXTERIOR CRUISE NOISE IS MOSTLY EXHAUST NOISE. AS FOR THE CABIN; COMFORT OF LIGHT PLANE FLYING WILL BE IMMENSELY IMPROVED WHEN THE USA LIGHT PLANE INDUSTRY LEARNS HOW BUILD EFFECTIVE EXHAUST NOISE MUFFLING SYSTEMS. THE FRENCH UNIT IS A GOOD START.

Posted by: Angelo Campanella | July 7, 2017 7:25 AM    Report this comment

In 1982 I learned that piston engine cabin noise is dominantly exhaust noise, and NOT propeller noise as the FAA and most other official agencies in the USA was touting at that time and often since. Exterior or community noise is affected by both. However the only time that exterior propeller noise is significant is on takeoff and climb when the propeller tip speed is highest and shock wave formation is approached. Exterior cruise noise is also mostly exhaust noise. As for the cabin, comfort of light plane flying especially for training and for passengers, the comfort and the attraction for flying will be immensely improved when the USA light plane industry learns how to build and sell effective exhaust noise muffling systems. This French unit is a good start.

Posted by: Angelo Campanella | July 7, 2017 7:39 AM    Report this comment

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