Top Letters And Comments, August 30, 2019

0

Why We Lose Control

This analysis is good as far as it goes, but it doesn’t go nearly far enough. A common misconception among aviation safety analysts is that pilots are rational, knowledgeable, risk-averse and teachable. Those who go to informal pilot gatherings — not big events and conventions — know that much of the pilot population just doesn’t want to be bothered. If you listen to conversations at those events, safety is never even discussed.

You frequently see the same attitudes in Flight Reviews and in transition training. Indeed, roughly 99.99% of flights avoid loss of control, so LOC isn’t on most pilots’ radar. Those pilots susceptible to loss of control are most unlikely to seek or receive risk management classes for something they never encounter and don’t care about. Dr. Bill Rhodes at the start of his safety lectures asks how many people know somebody who killed themselves in a small plane, show of hands; and then, another show of hands, how many of those accidents were not a surprise. He says that the typical percentage is about half.

The conclusion from all this is that new approaches are needed, not regulatory or training, but in the more difficult arena of pilot psychology and the even more difficult arena of pilot sociology. In other industries, this is called customer focus. Much of today’s safety emphasis uses shame and blame, and, predictably, is ignored by pilots. More effective would be an approach that values pilots. As the saying goes, if you always do what you always did, you’ll always get what you always got.

Ed W.

Small World

A few years back, at Oshkosh, I saw a beautiful El Camino parked by the security office across the street from the bunkhouse. In subsequent years, I looked for it, and admired it.

This year it was not there, so I checked in with security as to why, and was told the head of security sold it. Continuing the conversation, I was told that it was sold to someone in NH, and about 50 miles from me.

Prior to leaving for Osh this year, met an F4 pilot at my home airport who was heading for Osh by car, and told me he would attend my seminars. As it turned out he could not.

A few days ago, he visited me at my hangar, and….he was the one who purchased the Camino which he had with him.

It gets better: That beautiful car was once owned by Paul Poberezny, and has all the documentation when Paul bought it new.

Indeed a small world.

Archie

Supersonic Aircraft And The Environment

I’m also, like most rational people, concerned about the climate. But what I haven’t seen addressed is whether a new supersonic aircraft would create any more emissions than a conventional one. If it doesn’t, the point seems moot for now.

And as a lifelong professional pilot, I think that this technology (granted, only available to the ultra-rich at first) may someday benefit us all. Aviation is best when it’s moving forward. A new generation of supersonic airliners would surely follow eventually, and a two-hour flight to Hawaii sounds good to me when I reach my golden years.

Joe B.

Poll: Should the FAA Require More Training To Reduce the Stall Accident Rate?

Additional training is similar to enacting additional laws against criminal activity. The folks that disregard them will disregard additional ones also. You can’t legislate values or common sense.

Anonymous

Yes, short but comprehensive aerobatics training on stalls.

Anonymous

As long as we insist on speed to avoid stalls, instead of AOA information, nothing will change. An aircraft stalls at the same AOA regardless of speed. Present the info, then teach it.

Anonymous

Current training is sufficient.

Anonymous

Experience is the best teacher. I remember totally screwing-up my very first full-power stall in a C-150… yoke full back and fighting the wing-drop with aileron! Windshield FILLED with terrain… Instructor let it develop to a 2 1/4 turn spin before recovering – then demonstrated the correct procedure and calmly debriefed his badly shaken student on the ground. From that moment forward, I’ve had a tremendous respect for potential stall/spin conditions throughout the flight envelope! Somehow practicing approach-to-stall doesn’t instill the same respect or teach them what an UNEXPECTED stall/spin looks like – or what to do to prevent or recover.

Anonymous

Energy Management Training

Anonymous

Stall training needs and update. Underlying aerodynamics needs more understanding by pilots.

Anonymous

How many times don’t you already stall an airplane in training? There’s lots of emphasis on it. Apparently there needs to be more effective training.

Anonymous

Install AOA indicators.

Anonymous

Yes. Teach more of the basics of flying and less of the wizardry of electronics.

Anonymous

Look out the window instead of at the airspeed indicator! Pitch, Power, Performance. Make the pitch picture look reasonable, regardless of what the airspeed indicator says. When in doubt, release the back pressure.

Anonymous

Make stall spin training mandatory for Private Pilot Certificate

Anonymous

We need to go back to stick and rudder training where pilots really learn to fly!!

Anonymous

Probably the greatest lack of knowledge evidenced in the GA group is the ignorance regarding the particular aircraft’s “aerodynamic performance”!! This should be dealt with by responsible/knowledgeable pilots in the AOPA!!

Anonymous

Revert primary training emphasis back to stick and rudder skills via industry guidance and ACS revision. Technical and avionics skills are important, but the industry has adulterated the “Pilot” by designing “Easy Buttons” versus building airplanes that are safe (i.e. recoverable from a spin without a parachute). The industry appears to have focused on simplifying pilot certification possibly to assist their efforts selling airplanes. General Aviation OEMs need to realize that Aviation is Terribly Unforgiving of Incapacity…

Anonymous

Speed control is the main and first factor; not stall.

Anonymous

Basic stick and rudder training is needed.

Anonymous

Stop placing limitations on practice stalls for student pilots. All that does is instill the fear of stalls and spins. Aerobatic and spin training should be required. Experiencing full stalls and spins is the best teaching tool.

Anonymous

Yes, more training coupled with the deletion of the new definition of slow flight.

Anonymous

Teach stall/spins out of turns.

Anonymous

The ACS needs to be changed. Actual slow flight characteristics need to be experienced so new pilots recognize the warning signs, not just the horn or light, which can fail.

Yes, Developed Stall/Spin Entry & Recovery should be required within 2 years of earning PPL/LSA Certificate.

Anonymous

Anonymous

The airlines are doing this. We now do full stall at high and low altitude in swept wing aircraft, which until recently, wasn’t able to give accurate flight characteristics.

Anonymous

The FAA can’t handle what’s on its plate today … making STILL more training mandatory is a bad idea. And … I’m not even sure there IS a problem with stall accidents large enough to be statistically significant.

Anonymous

Yes, bring back spin training so when things go wrong you have a chance!

Anonymous

We already do at our airline, plus jet upset training.

Anonymous

Let’s face facts; there is no way in hell a pilot is going to recover from a stall close to the ground, on approach, unless that pilot has aerobatic training in, at least inverted flight.

Anonymous

Yes, but simulator training for real stalls rather than straight on as has been taught.

Anonymous

Ditch ACS in favor of traditional CFI-training.

Anonymous

Other AVwebflash Articles